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The Studying and Striving of Secondary Students

  • Tsun-Mu Hwang
Chapter
Part of the Education in the Asia-Pacific Region: Issues, Concerns and Prospects book series (EDAP, volume 26)

Abstract

The article explores the uniqueness of the social context of secondary education which arises from the influence of Chinese culture and tradition. Due to the social context of Taiwan and other countries with Chinese heritage, secondary school students have a perspective on learning behavior, daily school life, and the meaning of learning that varies considerably from the youth in Western countries. The ideal youth in Chinese society who are to work and live in the global world are expected to be the ones equipped with an integration of globalization and Chinese heritage. As a result, the main focus of teacher training programs should be on how to cultivate the younger generation to be ideal youth.

Keywords

High school High-stakes examination Ideal youth Learning Secondary education 

Notes

Acknowledgement

The author would like to express sincere appreciation and gratitude to Professor Shihkuan Hsu for her valuable suggestions and assistance with the translation of this chapter.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Taipei Municipal Jianguo High SchoolTaipeiTaiwan

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