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The Alignment of Technology with Other School Subjects

Chapter
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Part of the Contemporary Issues in Technology Education book series (CITE)

Abstract

This chapter examines the traditional separation, or siloing, of knowledge domains into distinct school subjects—languages, mathematics, science, social science, the arts, and technology—and considers the benefits and challenges of breaking down these silos and bringing about closer alignment between technology as a school subject, and other subject areas. One key purpose for aligning technology with other subjects is to increase the scope and opportunities for students to develop relevant skills and dispositions to address ‘wicked problems’—complex problems with multiple causes and interdependencies that are difficult or even impossible to solve, or even define, using the tools and techniques of only one organisation or discipline.

Keywords

Science Teacher Technology Education Technological Knowledge School Leader Teacher Knowledge 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of EducationUniversity of WaikatoHamiltonNew Zealand
  2. 2.University of WaikatoHamiltonNew Zealand

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