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Introduction

  • Tianxu ZhangEmail author
  • Yuehuan Wang
  • Sheng Zhong
Chapter
  • 139 Downloads
Part of the Unmanned System Technologies book series (UST)

Abstract

Target homing has been a kind of the most advanced, most effective and most accurate guidance system for aircraft and other moving platforms. It is a great invention of human beings made under the traction of economic and military needs and promotion of science and technology development in the modern society on the basis of learning and imitating the excellent guidance functions that many creatures in nature have after natural selection over a long term.

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Copyright information

© National Defense Industry Press, Beijing and Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Huazhong University of Science and TechnologyWuhanChina
  2. 2.Huazhong University of Science and TechnologyWuhanChina
  3. 3.Huazhong University of Science and TechnologyWuhanChina

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