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The Student Voice in South African Catholic School Religious Education

  • Paul FallerEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

A survey of the student voice in religious education was carried out in 2017 among 2025 students in South African Catholic secondary schools. The survey, administered through a questionnaire, and focusing on the students’ experience of teaching and learning in the subject, was prompted by a growing concern among those responsible for developing religious education at the very inconsistent and unequal practice in the schools.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Catholic Institute of EducationJohannesburgSouth Africa

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