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Teaching About Religious Diversity: Policy and Practice From the Council of Europe

  • Robert JacksonEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Changes in religious education in Europe and more widely since the 1960s have been complex. This complexity is documented in an ongoing series of books from the REL-EDU project at the University of Vienna. Readers are referred to these volumes for discussions of the different systems of European religious education (see, for instance Rothgangel, Jackson, & Jäggle, 2014).

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of WarwickCoventryUK

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