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Education Through Art: The Use of Images in Catholic Religious Education

  • Andrzej KielianEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Lack of biblical knowledge and of Christian doctrine, as well as of Church history and liturgy, frequently prevents people from understanding and thus from appreciating some of the greatest art which has ever been created.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The Pontifical University of John Paul IIKrakówPoland

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