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Formation for Mission: A Systems Model Within the Australian Context

  • David HallEmail author
  • William (Bill) Sultmann
Chapter

Abstract

The profile of the Catholic school in Australia is complex, multicultural, diverse and interdependent. While the mission of Catholic schools remains unchanged, Catholic employing authorities and Catholic entities are challenged to provide formation which is responsive to a new Catholic school community while being authentic to Church Tradition. Formation in this context cannot presume Baptism into a Christian community nor the practice of a Catholic faith Tradition. Rather, formation provides access and invites participation in processes that support an understanding of what is happening in the school, Church and in the world.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.La Salle Academy, Australian Catholic UniversitySydneyAustralia

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