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A Feminist Reading of Chinese Actress Liu Xiaoqing’s Screen Roles and Life Story

  • Shenshen CaiEmail author
  • Emily Dunn
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  • 191 Downloads

Abstract

Liu Xiaoqing, a name known in almost every Chinese household, symbolizes beauty and charm, female strength, avant-garde femininity, female entrepreneurship, and also rebellion. Through both her on-screen persona and her off-screen life, Liu Xiaoqing reflects changes in the thinking and behavior of contemporary Chinese women and the transformation of post-socialist Chinese society. From a feminist perspective, and serving as a social and cultural icon of a “strong woman” in contemporary China, the Liu Xiaoqing phenomenon highlights the many changes and trends in the lives of women in post-socialist China. As an avant-garde female figure in the post-Mao era, during which China has opened up to the outside world economically and culturally, Liu Xiaoqing’s case is worthy of an in-depth analysis. Her case illustrates how Chinese women’s attitudes toward professional career success, love, marriage, and family issues have negotiated these ongoing vicissitudes and changes; and how transformation of thought has led to an evolution in the development of feminist narratives and discourses in present-day China.

Keywords

Liu Xiaoqing Strong woman Avant-garde femininity Female entrepreneurship 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Swinburne University of TechnologyHawthornAustralia

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