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Situated Experience as Basis of Legitimate Law-Making: ILO Convention 189 and Domestic Workers in India

  • Supriya Routh
Chapter

Abstract

In 2011, the International Labour Organization (ILO) promulgated the Decent Work for Domestic Workers Convention and Recommendation, which India is yet to ratify. Recognizing the centrality of domestic work for economic productivity, the ILO Convention adopts a human rights approach to addressing marginalization and insecurity of domestic workers. In addition to declaring that labour rights enumerated in existing ILO standards are applicable to domestic workers unless they are expressly excluded, the Convention devises specific safeguards for domestic workers. One of the principal contributions of the Convention is that it recognizes home as a worksite, thereby obliterating the public/private distinction in conceptualizing valuable work that is worthy of legal cognizance.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Supriya Routh
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of LawUniversity of VictoriaVictoriaCanada

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