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Globalization, Democracy and the Capabilities Approach to Labour Law: Making the Case for Domestic Workers in India

  • Tvisha ShroffEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

The recent global financial crisis has triggered renewed thinking around the globalization of the world economy and the systems of market regulation best suited to its governance. The present-day globalization is rooted in neoliberal economic thought—strongly associated with the deregulation of labour laws and an accompanying erosion of social protections. Important concerns have been raised about this system of market ordering, particularly its implications for work security and equitable income distribution.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Ph.D. Candidate, Faculty of LawUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK

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