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Skin Anatomy and Morphology

  • Neera Yadav
  • Shama Parveen
  • Shilpa Chakravarty
  • Monisha Banerjee
Chapter
  • 323 Downloads

Abstract

The skin as an outer covering of the body is the largest organ and is obligatory for the support and protection of internal organs to function properly. It varies in thickness depending on its site and role it performs. It contains many appendages and glands to maintain homeostasis and normal temperature of the body. It also contains pigments which act as sunscreen to protect against UV radiation and is the site of vitamin D synthesis which is necessary for normal growth. The skin is divided in many layers based on the cellular structure to communicate in a way so as to function effectively. The cells of the skin contain numerous connecting proteins for transfer of messages across them. Genetic disorders in some of these proteins may lead to serious diseases.

Keywords

Skin Largest organ Homeostasis Protection Dermis Appendages 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Neera Yadav
    • 1
  • Shama Parveen
    • 1
  • Shilpa Chakravarty
    • 2
  • Monisha Banerjee
    • 1
  1. 1.Molecular and Human Genetics Laboratory, Department of ZoologyUniversity of LucknowLucknowIndia
  2. 2.Biochemistry DepartmentUniversity of AllahabadPrayagrajIndia

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