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Beyond National Frameworks: Patterns and Trends in Articles by Japanese Researchers Published in International Journals of Sociology of Education and Related Fields Since the 1990s

  • Taeko OkitsuEmail author
  • Eriko Yagi
  • Yuto Kitamura
Chapter
Part of the Education in the Asia-Pacific Region: Issues, Concerns and Prospects book series (EDAP, volume 46)

Abstract

This chapter examines how Japanese researchers’ contributions to the international scholarly community in the fields of sociology of education or related fields have transformed over the years. It does so by examining the trends and patterns of Japanese researchers’ articles in key international journals in these fields since the 1990s. The analysis of 90 articles revealed that Japanese researchers’ presence in the international scholarly community of the sociology of education and related fields has steadily increased since the 1990s, particularly through their active publications of English language articles in the field of comparative education, international education development, and higher education. The regions and themes of focus have also changed, from the dissemination of the particularities of Japanese education to the world in the 1990s to the investigation of contemporary educational issues through either single -country or comparative study and in more recent years to active engagement in theoretical and epistemological debates.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Otsuma Women’s UniversityTokyoJapan
  2. 2.The University of TokyoTokyoJapan

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