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3D Haptic-Audio Enabled Online Shopping: Development and Challenges of a New Website for the Visually Impaired

  • Kian Meng YapEmail author
  • Alyssa Yen-Lyn Ding
  • Hui Yin Yeoh
  • Mei Ling Soh
  • Min Wea Tee
  • Khailiang Ong
  • Wei Kang Kuan
  • Ahmad Ismat Abdul Rahim
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering book series (LNEE, volume 513)

Abstract

The advancement curve of Information Communication Technology (ICT) is growing rapidly over the years; it is essential to look into the application of the current technology to augment its potential benefits in the real world. One such area is how the current technology can be better adapted to contribute to the less privileged such as the visually impaired (VI) community, which is the focus of this project. While people with fully functional abilities are able to adapt to the rapid change in technology, VI individuals often stumble in this area. Due to their restricted visual abilities and heavy reliance on tactile perception which is minimized with the introduction of touchscreens, VI individuals experience difficulties in maximizing the benefits of technology. Not only that, it is also a challenge for VI individuals to navigate through websites, especially for the purpose of online shopping. This research looks at creating a new 3D haptic-audio virtual objects website to counter the internet browsing limitations of VI individuals, while enhancing their shopping experience. The challenges encountered in this process are further highlighted and discussed.

Keywords

Haptic-Audio shopping website Visually impaired Virtual environment 3D objects 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This Research is fully funded by the Malaysian Communications and Multimedia Commission through the Networked Media Research Grant (Grant No: EXT-FST-CIS-MCMC-2016-01, MCMC(IRLC) 700-8/2/2/JLD.2(9)). St Nicholas Home Penang, National Council for The Blind Malaysia (NCBM), and Malaysian Association for The Blind (MAB) have also contributed invaluable advice, time, support, and expertise such that the objectives of this research can be achieved.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kian Meng Yap
    • 1
    Email author
  • Alyssa Yen-Lyn Ding
    • 1
  • Hui Yin Yeoh
    • 1
  • Mei Ling Soh
    • 1
  • Min Wea Tee
    • 1
  • Khailiang Ong
    • 1
  • Wei Kang Kuan
    • 1
  • Ahmad Ismat Abdul Rahim
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Science and TechnologySunway UniversitySubang JayaMalaysia
  2. 2.Telekom Research & Development Sdn. Bhd. (TM R&D), TM Innovation CentreCyberjayaMalaysia

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