Introduction

Chapter
Part of the Perspectives in Cultural-Historical Research book series (PCHR, volume 4)

Abstract

This chapter provides a broad overview of the theoretical and methodological background of the book. It is argued that the fragmentation and decontextulization of Vygotsky’s theory constitutes an obstacle to its understanding and further development. It is proposed that a dialectical perspective to Vygotsky’s theory offers a new framework for its critical reflection as a developing research program in the broader landscape of the history of science and philosophy. Dialectic as a way of thinking focused on the investigation of the development of Vygotsky’s theory through the prism of its internal contradictions in terms of a drama of ideas.

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© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of CreteRethymnonGreece

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