Advertisement

Reconsidering Development Mechanisms of Tropical Agriculture: Focusing on Micro-Development in Mainland Southeast Asia

  • Yasuyuki Kono
  • Takahiro Sato
  • Kazuo Watanabe
  • Shinsuke Tomita
  • Le Zhang
Chapter
Part of the Asia in Transition book series (AT, volume 7)

Abstract

This chapter looks at everyday human behavior, agricultural development, and water use in mainland Southeast Asia and asks what kinds of mechanisms have formed in human societies that have developed in tandem with the biosphere and geosphere of the tropics. With the industrial revolution and the formation of modern nation-states, human societies acquired new technological regimes leading to the reorganization of  social life on an unprecedented scale. In the twentieth century, this unleashed a great production capacity that has supported materially abundant lifestyles. Yet simultaneously, this production capacity triggered various environmental issues and subsequent measures to deal with them. Currently, the tropics are a particularly striking example of the rapid decline and loss of species diversity and the irreversible environmental degradation brought about by subsequent large-scale agricultural development. This chapter aims to show that there coexist various development approaches with different timescales and different types of care for a local geosphere and biosphere, and argues the importance of experientially fostered knowledge to be integrated with scientific knowledge to cope the diversity and complexity of the tropics in Southeast Asia.

Keywords

Input-intensive agriculture Rainfed paddy cultivation Micro-development Farm-level water management Chinese market Commercial crop Experiential knowledge 

References

  1. Akimichi, T. (Ed.). (2009). An illustrated eco-history of the Mekong river basin. Bangkok: White Lotus.Google Scholar
  2. Aslam, A., & Prathapar, S. A. (2006). Strategies to mitigate secondary salinization in the Indus basin of Pakistan: A selective review. Colombo: International Water Management Institute.Google Scholar
  3. Bellwood, P. (2005). First farmers: The origins of agricultural society. Oxford: Blackwell Wiley.Google Scholar
  4. Daniels, C. (Ed.). (2008). Ronshu monsun Ajia no seitaishi Dai 2 maki Chi-iki no seitaishi [Eco-history of monsoon Asia Vol. 2. The eco-history of local Society]. Tokyo: Kobundo (in Japanese).Google Scholar
  5. Diamond, J. (1997). Guns, germs, and steel: The fates of human societies. New York: Norton.Google Scholar
  6. Fisher, B., & Tronto, J. (1990). Toward a feminist theory of caring. In F. Abel & M. Nelson (Eds.), Circles of care (pp. 35–62). New York: State University of New York.Google Scholar
  7. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). Statistical database (FAOSTAT). Retrieved August 4, 2016, from http://faostat3.fao.org/home/E.
  8. Fröhlich, H. L., Schreinemachers, P., Stahr, K., Clemens, G. (Eds.). (2013). Sustainable land use and rural development in Southeast Asia: Innovations and policies for mountainous Areas. Heidelberg: Springer.Google Scholar
  9. Fukui, H. (1993). Food and population in a northeast Thai village. Honolulu: University of Hawai’i Press.Google Scholar
  10. Funahashi, K. (1996). Farming by the older generation: The exodus of young labor in Yasothon Province, Thailand. Southeast Asian Studies, 33(4), 625–639.Google Scholar
  11. Funahashi, K. (Ed.). (2006). Don Daeng Mura Saisaiho: Hokuto Tai tensuimitsu noson ni 40 nen no idokenkyu. [Don Daeng village Re-revisited: Four decades of dynamism studies of a rainfed paddy growing village in northeast Thailand]. Kyoto: Ryukoku University (in Japanese).Google Scholar
  12. Furukawa, H., Nishibuchi, M., Kono, Y., & Kaida, Y. (2004). Ecological destruction, health and development. Kyoto: Kyoto University Press.Google Scholar
  13. Grandstaff, T. B., Grandsutaff, S., Limpiuntana, V., & Suphanchaimat, N. (2008). Rainfed revolution in Northeast Thailand. Southeast Asian Studies, 46(3), 289–376.Google Scholar
  14. Hayami, Y., & Kikuchi, M. (2000). A rice village saga: Three decades of green revolution in the Philippines. London: Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Hayami, Y., Nishi, M., & Kimura, S. (2012). Ningenken no saikochiku: Nettashakai no senzairyoku [Reconstituting the human domain: The potentialities of tropical societies] Kyoto: Kyoto University Press (in Japanese).Google Scholar
  16. Hoshikawa, K., & Watanabe, K. (2006). Changes in agricultural infrastructures in Don Daeng Village. In K. Funahashi (Ed.), Don Daeng Mura Saisaiho: Hokuto Tai tensuimitsu noson ni 40 nen no idokenkyu. [Don Daeng village Re-revisited: Four decades’ of dynamism studies of a rainfed paddy growing village in northeast Thailand]. Kyoto: Ryukoku University (in Japanese).Google Scholar
  17. Kanzaki, M., & Yamada, A. (2010). Seitai kiban toshite no seibutsu tayosei. [Biodiversity as the sustainable humanosphere]. In K. Sugihara, S. Kawai, Y. Kono, & A. Tanabe (Eds.), Chikyuken, seimeiken, ningenken: Jizokutekina seizon kiban wo motomete. [Geosphere, biosphere and human society: Searching for sustainable humanosphere] (pp. 153–184). Kyoto: Kyoto University Press (in Japanese).Google Scholar
  18. Kato, K. (1998). Shisonbanna no koekiro. [Trade routes of Xishuangbanna]. In T. Shintani (Ed.), Ogon no shikaku chitaki: Shan bunkaken no rekishi, gengo, minzoku [The golden square: History, language and ethnicity of Shan culture zone]. Tokyo: Keiyu-sha (in Japanese).Google Scholar
  19. Konchan, S., & Kono Y. (1996). Spread of direct seeded lowland rice in northeast Thailand: Farmers’ adaptation to economic growth. Southeast Asian Studies, 33(4), 523–546.Google Scholar
  20. Kono, Y. (2009). Hankan sochiiki no inasaku [Rice cultivation in semiarid regions] In S. Haruyama, M. Fujimaki, & H. Noma (Eds.), Asakura sekai chiri koza 3 Tonan Ajia [Asakura World Geography Vol. 3 Southeast Asia] (pp. 167–179). Tokyo: Asakura Shoten (in Japanese).Google Scholar
  21. Kono, Y., Miyagawa, S., & Watanabe, K. (2009). Interpreting social changes through a village level paddy productivity map. In T. Mizushima & M. Shibayama (Eds.), GIS for Area Studies (pp. 81–93). Tokyo: Kokin Shoin.Google Scholar
  22. Kono, Y., Song, S., & Hoshikawa, K. (2010). Mizu no riyo kara mita nettai shakai no tayosei [The diversity in water use of tropical societies]. In K. Sugihara, S. Kawai, Y. Kono, & A. Tanabe (Eds.), Chikyuken, seimeiken, ningenken: Jizokutekina seizon kiban wo Motomete [Geosphere, biosphere and human society: Searching for sustainable humanosphere] (pp. 185–209). Kyoto: Kyoto University Press (in Japanese).Google Scholar
  23. Kottek, M., Grieser, J., Beck, C., Rudolf, B., & Rubel, F. (2006). World map of the Köppen-geiger climate classification updated. Meteorol. Z., 15, 259–263.  https://doi.org/10.1127/0941-/2006/0130.
  24. Kozan, O. (2010). Chikyuken no kudoryoku toshite no nettai. [Tropics as the Driving Force of Geosphere] In K. Sugihara, S. Kawai, Y. Kono, & A. Tanabe (Eds.), Chikyuken, seimeiken, ningenken: Jizokutekina seizon kiban wo motomete [Geosphere, biosphere and human society: Searching for sustainable humanosphere] (pp. 129–152). Kyoto: Kyoto University Press (in Japanese).Google Scholar
  25. Krishnamurty, J. (2009). Learning from the 1997–1998 Asian financial crises: The ILO experience in Thailand and Indonesia, employment report No. 3. ILO.Google Scholar
  26. Krongkaew, M. (2004). The development of the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS): Real promise or false hope? Journal of Asian Economics, 15(5), 977–998.Google Scholar
  27. Kyuma, K. (2005). Tsuchi to ha nan darou ka [What is soil?]. Kyoto: Kyoto University.Google Scholar
  28. McNeill, J. R. (2000). Something new under the sun: An environmental history of the twentieth-century world. New York: Norton.Google Scholar
  29. Miyagawa, S. (1995). Expansion of an improved variety into rain-fed rice cultivation in northeast Thailand. Southeast Asian Studies, 33(2), 187–203.Google Scholar
  30. Nelson, A., & Gumma, M. K. (2015). A map of lowland rice extent in the major rice growing countries of Asia. http://irri.org/our-work/research/policy-and-markets/mapping.
  31. Sato, T., & Ramasamy P. (2011). The effects of expansion of private wells on rural livelihood in tank intensive watersheds: A case study in upper Gundar River Basin, Tamil Nadu. Southeast Asian Studies, 49(1), 124–150.Google Scholar
  32. Tomita, S., Kono, Y., Kotegawa, T., & Chowdary, B. M. (2008). Tonan ajia tairiku sanchibu no tochi riyou no gijutsu to chitsujo no keisei [Technology and regime formation of land use in the mountainous region of Southeast Asia]. In C. Daniels (Ed.), Monsun Ajia no seitai shi, Chiiki no seitai shi [Eco-history of Monsoon Asia Vol. 2 Eco-history of local society]. Tokyo: Kobundo (in Japanese).Google Scholar
  33. Tudge, C. (1999). Neanderthals, bandits and farmers: How agriculture really began. New Haven: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  34. United Nations Population Division. Retrieved July 27, 2016, from http://www.un.org/en/development/desa/population/.
  35. Watanabe, K., Hoshikawa, K., & Miyagawa, S. (2008). Taikoku tohokubu Don Daen mura in Okeru tensuiden no kugakaihen to sono suito seisan he no eikyo [Farm layout improvement and its impact on paddy productivity at Don Daeng village]. Nogyo nozon kogakukai ronbunshu [Northeast Thailand. Journal of Irrigation Engineering and Rural Planning], 76(1), 45–52.Google Scholar
  36. Yanagisawa, M., Kono, Y., Kozan, O., & Kanzaki, M. (2012). Chikyuken, seimeiken no Senzairyoku: Nettai chiikishakai no seizonkiban [The potentiality of geosphere and biosphere: Exploring the tropical humanosphere]. Kyoto: Kyoto University Press (in Japanese).Google Scholar
  37. Zhang, L., Kono, Y., & Kobayashi, S. (2014). The process of expansion in commercial banana cropping in tropical China: A case study at a Dai village, Mengla County. Agricultural Systems, 124, 32–38.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yasuyuki Kono
    • 1
  • Takahiro Sato
    • 2
  • Kazuo Watanabe
    • 1
  • Shinsuke Tomita
    • 3
  • Le Zhang
    • 4
  1. 1.Center for Southeast Asian Studies (CSEAS)Kyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  2. 2.Faculty of Agriculture and Life SciencesHirosaki UniversityHirosakiJapan
  3. 3.Graduate School of Environmental StudiesNagoya UniversityNagoyaJapan
  4. 4.School of Geography and EnvironmentJiangxi Normal UniversityNanchangChina

Personalised recommendations