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The Content and Design of Art Museum On-Line Learning Games For Children

  • Tiffany Shuang-Ching Lee
  • Larry Hong-Lin Li
  • Po-Hsien Lin
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 739)

Abstract

Theories of interactive learning and constructivism have changed museum professionals’ approach to education for children. Online learning has provided unprecedented opportunities for art museums to explore new educational approaches and to expand its educational mission. This research uses the online learning games that the National Palace Museum (NPM) created as a case study to examine the content and design of the interactive learning resources made available via its website. The result suggested that the online learning games might have embraced the interactive features, but lacked well defined educational objectives or curriculum structures.

Keywords

interactivity online learning museum education 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tiffany Shuang-Ching Lee
    • 1
  • Larry Hong-Lin Li
    • 1
  • Po-Hsien Lin
    • 1
  1. 1.National Taiwan University of ArtsNew Taipei CityTaiwan (R.O.C.)

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