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Kansei Engineering Approach in Designing Appealing Computer Animation Character

  • Teddy Marius Soikun
  • Ag. Asri Ag. Ibrahim
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 739)

Abstract

The creation of animation characters has always followed the principles of animation, particularly ‘appeal’. References on appealing character design drawings are available. However, these contributions only touch on the theoretical aspects and technical ‘how to’. Hence, the reference to designing Sabah’s own appealing oral tradition animation character was scarce. Review on literature shows the lack of impression and quantification methods that touches on appeal and attractiveness factors in character design drawing. Based on Kansei Engineering methodologies, as well as previous research related to animation character design, Japanese ‘oral tradition-based’ animation was chosen as a domain. It was chosen to measure the appealing factors embedded in them and create a guideline based on the ‘Kansei’ results. The guideline was then used to design Sabah’s own oral tradition animation character. Implementation of the research model in animation character design in the study has produced positive results. The result was then used to validate the model and was rationalized by the measurement of Kansei. Multivariate analysis, such as Factor Analysis and Partial Least Squares, was used in the analysis. The new Sabah Oral tradition animation character design was decided with animators and were reconfirmed by another Kansei validation survey.

Keywords

Oral Tradition Animation Kansei Engineering Concept Animation Character Appeal 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Humanities, Arts and HeritageUniversiti Malaysia SabahKota KinabaluMalaysia
  2. 2.Faculty of Computer & InformaticsUniversiti Malaysia SabahKota KinabaluMalaysia

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