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Picturing Wittgenstein’s Relationships to Education

  • Michael A. Peters
  • Jeff Stickney
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Education book series (BRIEFSEDUCAT)

Abstract

In this chapter, we introduce Ludwig Wittgenstein, initially providing background on his life and education in Austria and his relocation to England to study engineering and then philosophy. Addressing issues of interpretation and significance within the domain of philosophical biography, we reflect on the difficult path by which he came to hold positions of prominence in the philosophical community: first within the Vienna Circle of logical positivism, and later in holding a chair in philosophy at Cambridge University. Throughout this discussion, we mark the transition from his early work in the Tractatus and ‘Lecture on Ethics’, to his later work in the Investigations. The intervening period, in which he trained and taught as an elementary school teacher, is taken up in the subsequent chapters (Ch 2 & 3), along with discussion of his more developed thought on language and its relationship to training and learning. Here we set the stage for his appearance on the scene in Philosophy of Education.

Keywords

Cambridge Philosophical biography Vienna circle Logical positivism Tractatus University teaching 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of EducationWilf Malcolm Institute of Educational Research, The University of WaikatoHamiltonNew Zealand
  2. 2.Ontario Institute for Studies in EducationUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada

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