Grain Boundary Feature and Its Effect on Mechanical Property of Ni 690 Alloy Layer Produced by GTAW

  • Wangteng Lin
  • Xiao Wei
  • Shaofeng Yang
  • Yuqian Huang
  • Maolong Zhang
  • Weihua Liu
  • Jijin Xu
  • Junmei Chen
  • Chun Yu
  • Hao Lu
Conference paper
Part of the Transactions on Intelligent Welding Manufacturing book series (TRINWM)

Abstract

Ni690 alloy surfacing layers were fabricated by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) with two different heat inputs, namely, large heat input (LHI) and small heat input (SHI). The high temperature performance of the surfacing layer was evaluated by employing Gleeble 3500 thermal/mechanical simulator. It is found that the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the LHI samples was higher than that of the SHI samples after reheat thermal cycles, regardless of the reheating temperature. The EBSD result shows that the proportion of high angle grain boundaries (GBs, >15°) in the LHI sample was obviously higher than that in the SHI sample. And more M23C6 particles were found to precipitate at the high angle GBs. The relations among UTS, GB angle distribution and M23C6 precipitations were analyzed. Moreover, the fracture modes were characterized by optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The fracture mode was ductile fracture with deep dimples at 700 °C. While it changed to brittle intergranular fracture at 900 °C. As the temperature was enhanced to 1050 °C, the fracture returned to transgranular mode, with shallow dimples.

Keywords

Nickel based alloy Microstructure Grain boundary precipitates Mechanical property Welding 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors gratefully acknowledge the financial funding of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (51204107, 51575347 and 51405297).

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wangteng Lin
    • 1
  • Xiao Wei
    • 1
  • Shaofeng Yang
    • 1
  • Yuqian Huang
    • 1
  • Maolong Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Weihua Liu
    • 1
    • 3
  • Jijin Xu
    • 1
  • Junmei Chen
    • 1
  • Chun Yu
    • 1
  • Hao Lu
    • 1
  1. 1.Key Lab of Shanghai Laser Manufacturing and Materials Modification, School of Materials Science and EngineeringShanghai Jiao Tong UniversityShanghaiChina
  2. 2.Shanghai Electric Nuclear Power Equipment Co., Ltd.ShanghaiChina
  3. 3.China Nuclear Industry Fifth Construction Co., Ltd.ShanghaiChina

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