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High-Yielding Improved Varieties of Medicinal and Aromatic Crops for Enhanced Income

  • J. R. Bahl
  • A. K. Singh
  • R. K. Lal
  • A. K. Gupta
Chapter

Abstract

Medicinal and aromatic crops are now being considered as important commercial items for sustainable economic development of the country. To meet the demand of prominent industries producing herbal drugs, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, nutraceuticals, other confectionary items, etc., it has become imperative to produce the quality raw materials in significant quantities by evolving improved varieties through application of various breeding tools and developing improved agro-technologies and processing technological of the harvested produces. Presently, the medicinal plants and their various products/derivatives are looked upon not only as a source of affordable health care but also as an important commodity item of international trade and commerce. The medicinal plants-related trade is growing rapidly every year, but India’s share in the global market is not very impressive (about 2%). This dismal situation warranted to further gear up research and development activities in the area of medicinal plants followed by dissemination of improved plant varieties and agro-technologies among the growers and entrepreneurs.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. R. Bahl
    • 1
  • A. K. Singh
    • 1
  • R. K. Lal
    • 1
  • A. K. Gupta
    • 1
  1. 1.CSIR-Central Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants (CSIR-CIMAP), P.O.- CIMAPLucknowIndia

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