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Analysis of Current Curricula in the Chinese MTI Programme

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Abstract

This chapter, using three MTI courses as case studies, focuses on investigating how this professionally oriented translation programme is presented within Chinese traditions in teaching and learning from the perspective of course aims and module content. The specific aim of the Chinese MTI Programme is to produce graduates who are equipped to become high calibre professional translators to serve the nation’s economic, social and cultural development. This aim could be achieved through ‘training’ by providing students with a number of transferrable employability-related course components. In this vein this chapter also analyses how the selected case studies embed the ethos of ‘profession’ in their own curricula.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Foreign StudiesCUFEBeijingChina

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