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Analysis of Current Curricula in Translation Programmes in the UK

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Abstract

This chapter using three taught master’s translation courses as case studies, focuses on how translation courses are presented within the British traditions of teaching and learning from the perspective of course aims and module content. The key issue, namely the relation between educational content and market needs is fully embedded in the analysis of the curricula, and the translation market needs outlined in Chapter  2 are used as indicators to match the module content of the chosen programmes.

Keywords

Translation Program Translation Course Translation Market Subject Area Knowledge Competent Interpreters 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Foreign StudiesCUFEBeijingChina

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