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Teaching Translation in the UK and China

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Abstract

In this chapter, the existing literature about curriculum design and translation teaching is critically reviewed. Furthermore, due to the fact that the translation programmes in both the UK and China share the aim of preparing their students to become qualified professional translators, it is of paramount significance to identify what the demands and needs from the translation profession are. This chapter therefore analyses the market standards from Europe, the UK and China, which represent the regional, national or even international industry needs. These standards, in turn, could become references for the curriculum development of translation programmes at universities.

Keywords

Translation Teaching Professional Translators Translation Program Competent Interpreters National Occupational Standards 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Foreign StudiesCUFEBeijingChina

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