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Translation Studies in Higher Education Systems: The UK and China

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Abstract

This chapter introduces the changing roles of universities in the context of neo-liberal economic globalisation. One direct influence of these neo-liberal ideals on universities is that they have to make their courses more professional in order to meet the demands from the market, employers and students. Therefore, this chapter proposes the question of balancing academic and professional pedagogies in university-based degree courses for all subjects in general, and for translation programmes in particular. The recognition and development of Translation Studies as an independent academic discipline in both the West and China are also introduced in this chapter. Finally, this chapter discusses how the present analysis can be conducted with the help of a case study.

Keywords

Translational Studies Translation Program Language Services Translation Course Language Industry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Foreign StudiesCUFEBeijingChina

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