Steps Taken by the Government of India to Improve Quality of Care

Chapter

Abstract

This chapter discusses the measures implemented by government to improve quality of care. It also presents the efforts, supported by NGOs and donors, at assisting government to improve its quality of care by improving systems, implementing comprehensive interventions, and improving provider competencies for delivering specific contraceptive methods. To ensure quality of family planning services, efforts led by the government include introducing guidelines for equipment, supplies, infrastructure, outreach strategies, human resources, and establishing quality assurance committees at state and district levels. To address the concern over quality of sterilization services, specifically at camp facilities, the Family Planning Indemnity Scheme was introduced. In order to improve the method mix and offer more choices to couples, the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare is expanding the basket of contraceptive products by introducing new methods and improving the supply chain logistics management information system. Several NGOs with support from various donor agencies are working with government to augment service delivery to improve quality of care. This has resulted in increased acceptance of contraceptive methods, indicating some impact of improved quality of care.

Keywords

Family planning indemnity scheme Supply chain Logistics management Technical assistance 

References

  1. Chauhan, K. (2015a). Repositioning family planning: Strengthening services within the primary health care centre in Karnataka by Karuna Trust. In J. Satia, K. Chauhan, A. Bhattacharya, & N. Mishra (Eds.), Innovations in family planning: Case studies from India. New Delhi: SAGE Publications.Google Scholar
  2. Chauhan, K. (2015b). Reproductive Health Commodities Logistics Management Information System (RHCLMIS): Streamlining the supply chain for contraceptives in Odisha. In J. Satia, K. Chauhan, A. Bhattacharya, & N. Mishra (Eds.), Innovations in family planning: Case studies from India (pp. 67–78). New Delhi: SAGE Publications.Google Scholar
  3. Constella Futures. (2006). Ideas, insights, and innovations: Achievements and lessons learned from the Innovations in Family Planning Services (IFPS) project, 1992–2004. New Delhi: Constella Futures.Google Scholar
  4. EngenderHealth. (2003). COPE® handbook: A process for improving quality in health services. New York: EngenderHealth.Google Scholar
  5. EngenderHealth. (2005). EngenderHealth in India: Accomplishments under the Innovations in Family Planning Services project, 1996–2005. New Delhi: EngenderHealth India Country Office.Google Scholar
  6. Kumar, S., Sethi, R., Balasubramaniam, S., Charurat, E., Lalchandani, K., Semba, R., et al. (2014). Women’s experience with postpartum intrauterine contraceptive device use in India. Reproductive Health, 11, 32.  https://doi.org/10.1186/1742-4755-11-32.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  7. Mishra, N., & Bishnoi, S. (2015). Ananya: An integrated approach to achieve health for all. In J. Satia, K. Chauhan, A. Bhattacharya, & N. Mishra (Eds.), Innovations in family planning: Case studies from India (pp. 5–21). New Delhi: SAGE Publications.Google Scholar
  8. MoHFW (Ministry of Health and Family Welfare). (2012). Indian public health standards: Guidelines for community health centres. New Delhi: Directorate General of Health Services, Government of India.Google Scholar
  9. MoHFW (Ministry of Health and Family Welfare). (2013). Operational guidelines for quality assurance in public health facilities. New Delhi: Government of India. http://www.rrcnes.gov.in/quality%20Assurance/Operational%20Guidelines%20on%20Quality%20Assurance%20(Print).pdf. Accessed January 21, 2018.
  10. MoHFW (Ministry of Health and Family Welfare). (2015). Quality standards for urban primary health centres. New Delhi: Government of India.Google Scholar
  11. MoHFW (Ministry of Health and Family Welfare). (2016a, March). Manual for family planning indemnity scheme. New Delhi: Government of India. http://nhm.gov.in/images/pdf/programmes/family-planing/schemes/FPIS_2nd_Edition_2016.pdf. Accessed January 21, 2018.
  12. MoHFW (Ministry of Health and Family Welfare). (2016b). National consultation on comprehensive abortion care for women. New Delhi: Government of India.Google Scholar
  13. MoHFW (Ministry of Health and Family Welfare). (2016c). National family planning summit. Press Information Bureau and MoHFW, Government of India. http://pib.nic.in/newsite/PrintRelease.aspx?relid=138580. Accessed January 24, 2018.
  14. Nanda, P., Achyut, P., Mishra, A., & Calhoun, L. (2010). Measurement, learning and evaluation of the Urban Health Initiative: Uttar Pradesh, India, baseline survey 2010 (TWP-3-2011). Chapel Hill, NC: Measurement, Learning & Evaluation Project.Google Scholar
  15. Satia, J. (2015). Quality of care through quality assurance systems: The government of Maharashtra experience. In J. Satia, K. Chauhan, A. Bhattacharya, & N. Mishra (Eds.), Innovations in family planning: Case studies from India (pp. 51–66). New Delhi: SAGE Publications.Google Scholar
  16. Satia, J., & Chauhan, K. (2015). Urban Health Initiative (UHI): A comprehensive intervention to address family planning needs of the urban poor in Uttar Pradesh. In J. Satia, K. Chauhan, A. Bhattacharya, & N. Mishra (Eds.), Innovations in family planning: Case studies from India. New Delhi: SAGE Publications.Google Scholar
  17. Supreme Court of India. (2005). Record of proceedings. Order dated 1.3.2005, Writ Petition (Civil) No. 209/2003. Ramakant Rai v. Union of India. http://www.hrln.org/hrln/images/stories/pdf/ramakant-rai-order.pdf. Accessed January 24, 2018.

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Indian Institute of Public Health GandhinagarGandhinagarIndia
  2. 2.Public Health Foundation of IndiaGurgaonIndia

Personalised recommendations