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Treaty Ports and the Medical Geography of China: Imperial Maritime Customs Service Approaches to Climate and Disease

  • Stephanie Villalta Puig
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter studies the treaty ports of China as a medical boundary. The medical officers of the Imperial Maritime Customs Service divided the treaty ports of China into three geographical regions: Northern China, Central China, and Southern China. The chapter selects reports on two treaty ports in each region (Newchwang and Chefoo, Shanghae and Wenchow, and Amoy and Foochow, respectively) to document the approaches of the Imperial Maritime Customs Service to climate and disease. It argues that the practices of British medicine in the treaty ports of China were more under the influence of imperialist ideology and its idea of geography than the objectivity of science would have allowed.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephanie Villalta Puig
    • 1
  1. 1.The University of HullKingston upon HullUK

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