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Integrated Farming Systems for Sustainable Agriculture

  • N. A. Dar
  • Bilal Ahmad Lone
  • B. A. Alaie
  • Z. A. Dar
  • Gulzafar
  • F. A. Bahar
  • S. A. Haque
  • K. N. Singh
Chapter

Abstract

In the mid-1960s, there was little interaction between technical scientists (who were mostly on experiment stations) and social scientists (who tended to be concentrated in planning units). The green revolution was beginning to have a great deal of success in Asia and Latin America, being based on good climate (i.e. plenty of water) and soils, very homogeneous and favourable production environments and the adoption of improved varieties of wheat, maize and rice that were very responsive to fertilizer. Improved inputs were also readily available, and there was an accessible market for the products. However, in most of sub-Saharan Africa, and certain parts of Latin America and Asia, there has been no green revolution. This is because climatic conditions are often not as favourable (i.e. too much or too little rainfall and limited amounts of irrigation), soils are generally poor, production environments are very heterogeneous and poor, and the input and output markets are poorly developed. Not surprisingly, there has been great difficulty in developing improved technologies that are attractive to farmers in such areas.

Keywords

IFS Sustainability 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. A. Dar
    • 1
  • Bilal Ahmad Lone
    • 1
  • B. A. Alaie
    • 1
  • Z. A. Dar
    • 1
  • Gulzafar
    • 1
  • F. A. Bahar
    • 1
  • S. A. Haque
    • 1
  • K. N. Singh
    • 1
  1. 1.Shere –e- Kashmir University of Agricultural Sciences and TechnologySrinagarIndia

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