Inspection and Testing of Electroencephalographs, Electromyographs, and Evoked Response Equipment

Chapter
Part of the Series in Biomedical Engineering book series (BIOMENG)

Abstract

The chapter deals with the inspection of neurodiagnostic equipment based on measurement of electrophysiological signals in order to detect eventual problems and prevent them from becoming serious safety risks. In the first section of the text a brief description of the human neuromuscular system is given, followed by description and short historical overview of considered neurodiagnostic methods: electroencephalography (EEG) including evoked potentials (EP), electromyography (EMG) and nerve conduction study (NCS). Operating principle of computer-controlled neurodiagnostic instrument is explained using generic block diagram. The next sections discuss potential harms and hazards associated with the use of neurodiagnostic equipment as well as standards and regulations concerning basic safety and essential performance requirements for mentioned equipment. The last section describes inspection procedure for periodical testing of modern computer-based nerodiagnostic instruments in the field.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Electrical Engineering and ComputingUniversity of ZagrebZagrebCroatia

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