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Inspection and Testing of Noninvasive Blood Pressure Measuring Devices

  • Igor Lacković
Chapter
Part of the Series in Biomedical Engineering book series (BIOMENG)

Abstract

The main purpose of the present chapter is to provide an overview of noninvasive blood pressure measuring devices and their inspection and testing. The chapter first introduces systematic classification of methods for blood pressure measurement. Moreover strengths and weaknesses of each method are discussed. Devices for noninvasive blood pressure measurement are described. Several international standards for evaluating the accuracy of blood pressure monitors (AAMI/ANSI SP10, BHS, DIN, IEC, etc.) are compared. After that a section on the inspection and testing of noninvasive blood pressure measuring devices as recommended by the International Organization of Legal Metrology (OIML) is presented. At the end of this chapter a short summary is given emphasizing the importance of accuracy testing of noninvasive blood pressure measuring devices.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Electrical Engineering and ComputingUniversity of ZagrebZagrebCroatia

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