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Confucianism

  • Jack Barbalet
Chapter

Abstract

Weber treats Confucianism as a more or less static ethic of the scholar-administrators, the literati, of Imperial China. This chapter explores changes in Confucianism over the course of its long history, and the basis of its dynamism. The sixteenth-century Jesuit mission in China formed a sense of Confucianism that fitted their own purposes, similar to the purposes of missionaries in general. Their understanding of Confucianism influenced subsequent missionary interpretations and these in turn influenced Weber’s account of Confucianism. At the time that Weber wrote about Confucianism, China was undergoing an anti-Confucian revolution and Confucianism itself began to change in ways that continue up to the present. Weber ignored these developments, which are discussed in the chapter, although they could have enlarged his approach.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jack Barbalet
    • 1
  1. 1.Australian Catholic UniversityMelbourneAustralia

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