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Morbidity Pattern of Elderly in India

  • Poulomi ChowdhuryEmail author
  • Mausam Kumar Garg
  • Laishram Ladusingh
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  • 427 Downloads
Part of the India Studies in Business and Economics book series (ISBE)

Abstract

This study sheds light on the pattern and trend of chronic diseases among the elderly over time using three sources of data—NSSO 60th round (2004), WHO-SAGE (WHO SAGE Survey Manual: The WHO Study on Global AGEing and Adult Health (SAGE). Geneva, World Health Organization. 2006) and LASI (Longitudinal Aging Study in India, Pilot Wave. Harvard School of Public Health, International Institute of Population Sciences, Mumbai, India, and RAND Corporation. 2011). Based on ICD-10, the diseases are been classified into three categories—communicable diseases, non-communicable diseases and other diseases and disabilities. Trends in prevalence of diseases under these three broad classifications by sex, age groups and residence are estimated and analyzed. A decomposition method has been used, to check the significant difference in the gender gaps in the prevalence of morbidity. Non-communicable and other diseases and disabilities are found to have increase over time regardless of background characteristics of individuals, whereas it is the reverse case for communicable diseases and the prevalence of diseases are higher among elderly females than the males. The gender differentials in prevalence of diseases are found to be statistically significant. The concluding message of the study is that morbidities among the elderly are expected to escalate in future.

Keywords

Communicable diseases Non-communicable diseases Other diseases and disabilities Prevalence Decomposition method Gender gap 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Poulomi Chowdhury
    • 1
    Email author
  • Mausam Kumar Garg
    • 1
  • Laishram Ladusingh
    • 2
  1. 1.International Institute for Population SciencesMumbaiIndia
  2. 2.Department of Mathematical Demography and StatisticsInternational Institute for Population SciencesMumbaiIndia

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