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Thailand: Background, Economic Conditions, and Tourism

  • Scott Hipsher
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Abstract

The modern country of Thailand has evolved from the earlier kingdoms of Lannathai, Sukhothai, and Ayutthaya. Thailand is the only country of Southeast Asia which has never been part of a European colonial empire. Despite the ending of the absolute power of the Monarchy in the 1930s, the Royal family remains an important feature of Thai society. Politically, the past 80 years have been dominated by a series of alternating democratic and military-led governments. Currently, the government is under military control, and there is a lot of uncertainty about the future political direction the country will take. The country saw fast economic growth and poverty reductions in the last years of the twentieth century fueled by increased levels of FDI and exports, but the country has in more recent years seen some of the slowest economic growth rates in the Asia-Pacific region while experiencing increasing levels of inequality and increasing income gaps between urban and rural areas. Tourism is a very important component of the Thai economy, and its importance has grown in recent years due to a slow-down in exports and incoming FDI. The experiences and opinions about the tourism industry of a few workers from a hotel in the northern part of the country are presented.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Scott Hipsher
    • 1
  1. 1.Webster University ThailandBangkokThailand

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