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Recommendations and Conclusion

  • Scott Hipsher
Chapter
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Abstract

There are no easy answers to eliminating global poverty, but there are some well-established ideas which have been proven to contribute to creating the wealth in poor communities needed to substantially reduce poverty. It is suggested international organizations, charities, and national governments providing foreign aid reconsider their approaches and base their decisions on empirical evidence and not political ideology or the desire to see the continuation of existing approaches and programs. It is suggested national governments work to increase economic freedom, integration in international trade, tackle corruption through reducing government control of an economy, improve the functioning of government officials, further integrate economically within the region, emphasis education, build the needed infrastructure, and create more democratic, transparent, and accountable institutions. The primary recommendation for private sector enterprises is to actively seek out opportunities to create jobs and economic growth in regions where poverty is widespread. Recommendations for consumers and tourists are to engage in economic exchanges with individuals and businesses in developing countries but to avoid making decisions based on simplistic and emotional appeals. Poverty is not only a problem for people living in poverty but also causes social problems and deprives societies of the talents and potential contribution of individuals who are never able to develop to their fullest due to lacking opportunities.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Scott Hipsher
    • 1
  1. 1.Webster University ThailandBangkokThailand

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