Alarming System for Railway Crossing

  • Aishwarya Chauhan
  • Satish Kumar
  • Neha Gupta
  • Rajesh Singh
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 624)

Abstract

The paper given below is the introduction of a new system on railway crossings. The following alarming system is to make people aware of the presence of the locomotive nearby and would warn them to clear the crossings before the locomotive to cross the track so as to reduce the number of accidents. The use of traffic lights as well as sensors help in the functioning of alarming system introduced. The traffic lights would in turn use conventional source of power that is solar power which will increase the efficiency of the system.

Keywords

ASRC Arduino uno Vibration sensor Solar panel Power supply Electrical bell Traffic lights 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aishwarya Chauhan
    • 1
  • Satish Kumar
    • 1
  • Neha Gupta
    • 1
  • Rajesh Singh
    • 1
  1. 1.Electronics Instrumentation and Control Engineering Department, College of Engineering StudiesUniversity of Petroleum and Energy StudiesDehradunIndia

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