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The Scramble for Africa’s Agricultural Land: A Note on India’s Excursus

  • Praveen JhaEmail author
  • Archana Prasad
  • Santosh Verma
  • Nilachala Acharya
Chapter
  • 211 Downloads
Part of the Advances in African Economic, Social and Political Development book series (AAESPD)

Abstract

This chapter maps the scope and extent of transnational land acquisitions and investments in Africa by Indian entities. It also establishes the links between such investments and State policy, both, of the host and destination countries. In order to bring out the broader implications associated with the ongoing scramble, the chapter uses the example of three nations with a high concentration of Indian investments, namely Ethiopia, Mozambique and Tanzania. The impact of land investments on the livelihoods and accelerated process of semi-proletarianisation of the peasants, particularly the small farmers is also discussed in the chapter.

Keywords

Land acquisition Agriculture Transnational corporations Semi-proletarianisation of small holder farmers 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Praveen Jha
    • 1
    Email author
  • Archana Prasad
    • 2
  • Santosh Verma
    • 3
  • Nilachala Acharya
    • 1
    • 4
  1. 1.Centre for Economic Studies and PlanningJawaharlal Nehru UniversityNew DelhiIndia
  2. 2.Centre for Informal Sector and Labour StudiesJawaharlal Nehru UniversityNew DelhiIndia
  3. 3.Tata Institute of Social SciencesHyderabadIndia
  4. 4.Centre for Budget and Governance AccountabilityJawaharlal Nehru UniversityNew DelhiIndia

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