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Smartphones and Portable Media Devices as Wearable and Wireless Systems for Gait and Reflex Response Quantification

  • Robert LeMoyneEmail author
  • Timothy Mastroianni
Chapter
  • 665 Downloads
Part of the Smart Sensors, Measurement and Instrumentation book series (SSMI, volume 27)

Abstract

The smartphone and portable media device are equipped with inertial sensors, such as an accelerometer and gyroscope. With the proper software application they can function as wireless accelerometer and gyroscope platforms. This capability enables the smartphone and portable media device to function as wearable and wireless systems for gait and reflex response. The experimental trial data can be conveyed through wireless connectivity to the Internet as an email attachment for post-processing. The signal data can be further consolidated into a feature set for machine learning classification. Many experimental scenarios pertaining to quantifying the domains of gait and reflex response are presented. The smartphone and portable media device present an insightful perspective of the significant potential of Network Centric Therapy.

Keywords

Smartphone Portable media device Wireless accelerometer Wireless gyroscope Inertial sensor Gait Gait analysis Tendon reflex Wireless quantified reflex device Impact pendulum Machine learning 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Biological Sciences, Center for Bioengineering InnovationNorthern Arizona UniversityFlagstaffUSA
  2. 2.IndependentPittsburghUSA

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