Advertisement

Innovation in Power Sources for Taiwan’s Railways in the Period of US Aid (1950–1965)

  • Lung-Pao TsaiEmail author
Chapter
  • 393 Downloads
Part of the Studies in Economic History book series (SEH)

Abstract

It’s worthy of consideration that the relationship between Taiwan, the US, and Japan in this period is formed of cooperation, dependence, and the issues formed by Taiwan obtaining foreign capital and suffering invasion of its capital. If a country wants to develop itself but lacks sufficient funds and technology, it is necessary to cooperate with or depend on other countries. Since the TRA did not attach importance to technical research and development, and expected the “Mainland China Recovery” to take place, it naturally cooperated with the US and Japan (which were the anti-communist alliance) to complete its technological innovations. Taiwan’s development conditions were different from the United States’ as well as Japan’s. The partial dieselization policy adopted by the TRA had its own unique features and necessities, and met Taiwan’s phased demands adequately at the time. In this process, the US well exceeded Japan in influence over Taiwan. Also, the US aid operations were highly beneficial for the US firms involved. The cooperation structure of Taiwan, the US, and Japan can be observed clearly in the TRA’s development in the US-aid period. This structure’s influence can clearly be seen in the long-term development of the TRA.

Keywords

TRA US-aid Dieselization Locomotive Consulting company 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by Ministry of Science and Technology, Taiwan, R.O.C. Grant Number 105-2410-H-305 -056 -.

Primary Sources

  • 4-year CEPD plan (19571959) (Bound Volume) (1958). In Archives of Department of Transportation, Taiwan Provincial Government, File ID: 064000000006A. Preserved at Academia Sinica.

  • American advisors’ inspection report (1952). In Archives of Taiwan Railway Administration, Department of Transportation, Taiwan Provincial Government, File ID: A31518000 M. Preserved at National Archives Administration.

  • Council for US aid official document in February, 1957 (Tai Mei Ji (46) Word 0657 Letter) Meeting Minutes of Cross-Island Highway Construction Conference of Council for US Aid and Veterans Affairs Commission (1956), File ID: 064000000964A. Preserved at Academia Sinica.

  • Taiwan Railway Administration Equipment Expansion Plan, Sea-line centralized traffic control signal devices operators (1964–1970). In Economic Department Archives, File ID: 36-05-043-003. Preserved at Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica

  • Taiwan Railway Administration dieselization planthe procurement of 31 diesel-powered locomotives (1958–1961). In Economic Department Archives, File ID: 36-05-043-006. Preserved at Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica.

  • Taiwan Railway Administration, The 34 diesel-powered locomotives (1950–1963). In Economic Department Archives, File ID: 36-05-043-009. Preserved at Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica.

References

  1. Anonymous. 1960a. First batch of 4 diesel-powered locomotives will come in next month, Business Communication, No. 82(1).Google Scholar
  2. Anonymous. 1960b. 4 diesel-powered locomotives arrived at Keelung harbor by an American ship yesterday, Central Daily News, 6. (April 4, 1960).Google Scholar
  3. Chang, Chun. 1991. Theory and practice of railway transportation. Taipei: Taiwan Business.Google Scholar
  4. Chen, Shu-Hsi. 1995a. Chen, Shu-Hsi memoirs 2: chief of Taiwan railway transportation service for 13 years. Chinese and Overseas Magazine 57–2: 66–75.Google Scholar
  5. Chen, Shu-Hsi. 1995b. Chen, Shu-Hsi memoirs 5: president of Taiwan railway for 5 years. Chinese and Overseas Magazine 57–5: 52–59.Google Scholar
  6. Chen, Yu-Hsi. 1995c. Dependent development of Taiwan. Taipei: RenJian Publishing Co.Google Scholar
  7. China Communications Construction Association. 1953. Report on transportation and communication in the past 3 years. Taipei: China Communications Construction Association.Google Scholar
  8. Chiu, Hung-Chih. 2010. The 50th anniversary of Taiwan railway locomotive dieselization. Biographies 94–4: 19–29.Google Scholar
  9. Chou, Hsiu-Huan. 1995. US aid archives in the early postwar period, Volume 1, Military assistance 1. Taipei: Academia Historica.Google Scholar
  10. Council for International Economic Corporation and Development, Executive Yuan. 1964. Review on US-aid applications 10–review on US-aid applications in Taiwan railway construction. Taipei: Council for International Economic Corporation and Development, Executive Yuan.Google Scholar
  11. Hsiao, Hui-Huang, and Yue-Yi Guo. 1994. Taiwan railway trains 83. Taipei: Taiwan Railway Administration.Google Scholar
  12. Kerr, George H. 2014. Formosa betrayed. Taipei: Taiwan Association of University Professors.Google Scholar
  13. Liu, Jing-Qing. 1994. Economical analysis of post-war Taiwan. Taipei: RenJian Publishing Co.Google Scholar
  14. Miller, Merle. 1974. Plain speaking: an oral biography of Harry S. Truman: Putnam Publishing Group.Google Scholar
  15. Shou, Jyun-Ren. 1960a. Introduction to the structure and characteristics of the second batch of assembled diesel-powered locomotives unloaded from ships, Business Communication, No. 91(2). (July 1, 1960).Google Scholar
  16. Shou, Jyun-Ren. 1960b. Introduction to the structure and characteristics of the first batch of assembled Hitachi diesel-powered locomotives unloaded from ships, Business Communication, No. 92(2). (July 16, 1960).Google Scholar
  17. Su, Chao-Hsu. 2009. The illustrated handbook of Taiwan railway stock. Taipei: RénRrén Publishing Co.Google Scholar
  18. Taiwan Railway Administration. 1959. Taiwan railway in the past ten years. Taipei: Taiwan Railway Administration.Google Scholar
  19. Taiwan Railway Administration. 1987. Taiwan railway centennial. Taipei: Taiwan Railway Administration.Google Scholar
  20. Taiwan railway fact-finding delegation. 1953. Report on visiting American and Japanese railways. Taipei: Taiwan Railway Administration.Google Scholar
  21. Takeharu, Sasamoto. 1992. Industrial development process. In The formation of international machining base: Taiwan’s industrialization, ed. Takao Taniura. Taipei: RenJian Publishing Co.Google Scholar
  22. Tsai, Lung-Pao. 2007. Technology transfer in the colonies - case study of railway staff in Taiwan Governor-General’s Office, Corporate activities and role of financial markets in Asian economic development: history and present. ed. Hirohiko, Shinbo. Osaka: Osaka Sangyo University Asian Community Research Center.Google Scholar
  23. Wen, Wen-Yu. 2010. The study of railway history in postwar Taiwan:in the period of Mo-heng (1949–1961). Taipei: Graduate Institute of Taiwan History, National Chengchi University.Google Scholar
  24. Yeh, Hui-Fen. 2009. Chen, Cheng’s official career archive selection: meeting minutes of council for US aid. Executive Yuan, Taipei: Academia Historica.Google Scholar
  25. Zhao, Jie-Qian. 1983. Transportation development strategy. Taipei: Linking Publishing Co.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of HistoryNational Taipei UniversitySan Shia District, New Taipei CityTaiwan

Personalised recommendations