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The Engine of Chinese Neoliberalism

Chapter

Abstract

This chapter provides a background discussion of the intellectual movement of governance. Quan argues that contextual factors have played a significant role in the rise and spread of governance ideas in transitional China. Specifically, the institutional context focuses on policy shifts of the party-state along the neoliberal line, and the intellectual context emphasizes the political discourses (social harmony and modernization of state governance) in which the idea of governance prevails. He seeks to explain: What characterizes transitional China as a neoliberal regime? What are the dynamics of its ideological manifestations? Why were governance ideas promoted as an integral part of the political project of neoliberalism? What was the central problem of governance for its proponents? Moreover, what was the political-intellectual atmosphere of the increasing interest in governance issues? Finally and most importantly, why is the idea of governance so essential to the neoliberal imperative in China? These answers are crucial to understanding the rationale of governance ideas in context.

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© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Quan Li
    • 1
  1. 1.Sun Yat-sen UniversityGuangzhouChina

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