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Selection of Best State for Tourism in India by Fuzzy Approach

  • Shalini Singh
  • Varsha Mundepi
  • Deeksha Hatwal
  • Vidhi Raturi
  • Mukesh Chand
  • Rashmi
  • Sanjay Sharma
  • Shwetank AvikalEmail author
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 553)

Abstract

India has always been an attraction seeker to tourist from all over the world. India indeed stands through its tittle “INCREDIBLE INDIA” because of its diversity in culture and religion. Tourism in India is economically important and is growing rapidly. About 22.57 million tourist arrived in India in 2014, compared to 19.80 million in 2013. In terms of foreign tourist arrivals, India ranked as the 38th country in the world. With the help of Fuzzy-AHP technique, i.e. Fuzzy Analytical Hierarchy Process is the best method decided for finding the most influential tourist place from the tourist point of view. The purpose of this work is to present a multi criteria decision making (MCDM) model for management of tourists across various tourist places in India. In this work five (5) criteria from various literature reviews and practical investigations has been taken. Fuzzy-AHP techniques is used to ample decision makers assesments about criteria weightings. Finally, a factual study is done for identifying the best tourist place across India. In this work, about 30 states are taken and various survey are conducted among different groups of people and then final decision is made by the computational process and effectiveness of Fuzzy-AHP.

Keywords

Tourism management MCDM AHP Fuzzy set 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shalini Singh
    • 1
  • Varsha Mundepi
    • 1
  • Deeksha Hatwal
    • 1
  • Vidhi Raturi
    • 1
  • Mukesh Chand
    • 1
  • Rashmi
    • 1
  • Sanjay Sharma
    • 1
  • Shwetank Avikal
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringGraphic Era Hill UniversityDehradunIndia

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