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Rasch Model (The Dichotomous Case)

  • Margaret Wu
  • Hak Ping Tam
  • Tsung-Hau Jen
Chapter

Abstract

There are many different IRT models. The simplest model specification is the dichotomous Rasch model. The word “dichotomous” refers to the case where each item is scored as correct or incorrect (0 or 1).

Supplementary material

References

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Further Readings

  1. Baker F (2001) The basics of item response theory. ERIC Clearinghouse on Assessment and Evaluation, University of Maryland, College Park, MD. Available online at http://edres.org/irt/baker/
  2. Fischer GH, Molenaar IW (eds) (1995) Rasch models: foundations, recent developments, and applications. Springer, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  3. Hambleton RK, Swaminathan H, Rogers HJ (1991) Fundamentals of item response theory. Sage, Newbury ParkzbMATHGoogle Scholar
  4. Harris D (1989) Comparison of 1-, 2-, and 3-parameter IRT models. NCME Instructional Topics in Educational Measurement Series (ITEMS) Module 7. Retrieved 21 July 2014 from http://ncme.org/publications/items/. There are other modules at this website on various topics of educational measurement
  5. Rasch G (1980) Probabilistic models for some intelligence and attainment tests. University of Chicago Press, ChicagoGoogle Scholar
  6. Rasch Measurement Transactions. http://www.rasch.org/rmt. Many helpful articles can be found at this website

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National Taiwan Normal UniversityTaipeiTaiwan
  2. 2.Educational Measurement SolutionsMelbourneAustralia
  3. 3.Graduate Institute of Science EducationNational Taiwan Normal UniversityTaipeiTaiwan
  4. 4.National Taiwan Normal UniversityTaipeiTaiwan

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