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Toys and the Creation of Cultural Play Scripts

  • Anne KulttiEmail author
  • Ingrid Pramling Samuelsson
Chapter
Part of the International Perspectives on Early Childhood Education and Development book series (CHILD, volume 18)

Abstract

This chapter aims to discuss play in early childhood education (ECE) practices in contemporary societies through a study of objects as mediational tools in children’s play. The chapter builds on Vygotsky’s theory of the development of play and the way in which meaning comes to dominate objects and actions. In the empirical study, the use of objects in play with four children is analysed. The analysis reveals the complexity of creating cultural play scripts (narrative scenarios). The study found that it is the objects available and used rather than the children’s ideas and fantasies that co-constitute the meaning of the play. The study actualises the need to view teachers as more knowledgeable others in acting within imaginary framings and creating a proximal zone of development in play-based practice. This issue is discussed in terms of teaching in and through play in ECE. The role of ECE in supporting children to appropriate cultural tools of a general character is considered fundamental to creating equal learning opportunities.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Education, Communication and LearningGothenburg UniversityGöteborgSweden

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