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China’s Steel Industry Transformed by Circular Economy

  • Jianguo QiEmail author
  • Jingxing Zhao
  • Wenjun Li
  • Xushu Peng
  • Bin Wu
  • Hong Wang
Chapter
Part of the Research Series on the Chinese Dream and China’s Development Path book series (RSCDCDP)

Abstract

China is among the countries that first invented and used ironware, but its first steel plant, in the modern sense, had not been established until 1890 in Hanyang. When the People’s Republic of China was founded in 1949, its pigiron output and steel output stood respectively at only 250,000 and 158,000 tons. The annual steel output ranked 26th in the world, and the per capita steel output was only 300 g. Except the iron and steel products for daily use and simple instruments of labour, iron and steel had not been applied for industrial purposes.

Keywords

Blast Furnace Steel Industry Blast Furnace Slag Steel Slag Steel Plant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Social Sciences Academic Press and Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jianguo Qi
    • 1
    Email author
  • Jingxing Zhao
    • 1
  • Wenjun Li
    • 1
  • Xushu Peng
    • 1
  • Bin Wu
    • 1
  • Hong Wang
    • 1
  1. 1.Chinese Academy of Social SciencesBeijingChina

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