Advertisement

Travel Plans and Their Application to New Developments

  • Chris De GruyterEmail author
Chapter
  • 253 Downloads
Part of the Springer Theses book series (Springer Theses)

Abstract

The aim of this chapter is to provide a review of the literature on travel plans and their application to new developments. Research gaps identified from the literature review are also discussed which then become the focus of this thesis in subsequent chapters.

Keywords

Travel Behaviour Residential Development Local Council Travel Pattern Residential Site 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. ABC. (2014). Establishing an effective commute trip reduction policy in Massachusetts. Massachusetts, US: A Better City (ABC).Google Scholar
  2. ACT Canada & Noxon Associates Limited. (2010). Workplace travel plans: Guidance for Canadian employers, Transport Canada.Google Scholar
  3. Addison, L. (2002). Using the planning process to secure sustainable transport. Paper presented to European Transport Conference, Homerton College, Cambridge, UK.Google Scholar
  4. Addison & Associates. (2008). Delivering travel plans through the planning process—Research report. London, UK: Department for Transport and Communities and Local Government.Google Scholar
  5. Ampt, E. S., Richardson, A. J., & Wake, D. (2009). Simple and suited: Guidelines for workplace travel surveys. Paper presented to 32nd Australasian Transport Research Forum (ATRF), Auckland, New Zealand.Google Scholar
  6. Arlington County Commuter Services. (2013). Residential building transportation performance monitoring study, Arlington, Virginia, US.Google Scholar
  7. Atkins, W. S. (2002). Workplace travel plan evaluation tool v2.7. Department for Transport. Retrieved September 25, 2014, from http://www.imsaho.com/miscellaneous/travel_plan_evaluation_tool.asp.
  8. ATOC. (2013). Guidance on the implementation of station travel plans. UK: Association of Train Operating Companies.Google Scholar
  9. Baker, L. (2007). Workplace travel plans—A new rule of the game. Paper presented to New Zealand Planning Institute and EAROPH Conference, Palmerston North, New Zealand.Google Scholar
  10. Bamberg, S., & Moser, G. (2007). Why are work travel plans effective? Comparing conclusions from narrative and meta-analytical research synthesis. Transportation, 34, 647–666.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Baudains, C. (2003). Environmental education in the workplace: Inducing voluntary travel behaviour change to decrease single occupant vehicle trips by commuters into the Perth CBD. PhD Thesis, Murdoch University.Google Scholar
  12. BioRegional. (2009). BedZED seven years on: The impact of the UK’s best known eco-village and its residents, UK.Google Scholar
  13. Bradshaw, R., Lane, R., Tanner, G., & Wofinden, D. (1998). Levels of acitivity relating to safer routes to school type projects and green transport plans. London: University of Westminster and Social and Transport Research Services.Google Scholar
  14. British Standards Institution. (2008). PAS 500: 2008—National specification for workplace travel plans, London, UK.Google Scholar
  15. Brockman, R., & Fox, K. R. (2011). Physical activity by stealth? The potential health benefits of a workplace transport plan. Public Health, 125, 210–216.Google Scholar
  16. Brög, W., Erhard, E., Ker, I., Ryle, J., & Wall, R. (2009). Evaluation of voluntary travel behaviour change: Experiences from three continents. Transport Policy, 16, 281–292.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Cairns, S., Davis, A., Newson, C., & Swiderska, C. (2002). Making travel plans work: Research report. London, UK: Department for Transport.Google Scholar
  18. Cairns, S., & Newson, C. (2006). Making school travel plans work: Effects, benefits and success factors at English schools, Association for European Transport and contributors.Google Scholar
  19. Cairns, S., Newson, C., & Davis, A. (2010). Understanding successful workplace travel initiatives in the UK. Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, 44(7), 473–494.Google Scholar
  20. Cairns, S., Sloman, L., Newson, C., Anable, J., Kirkbride, A., & Goodwin, P. (2004). Smarter choices—Changing the way we travel. UK: Department for Transport.Google Scholar
  21. Cairns, S., Sloman, L., Newson, C., Anable, J., Kirkbride, A., & Goodwin, P. (2008). Smarter choices: Assessing the potential to achieve traffic reduction using ‘soft measures’. Transport Reviews, 28(5), 593–618.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Coleman, C. (2000). Green commuter plans and the small employer: An investigation into the attitudes and policy of the small employer towards staff travel and green commuter plans. Transport Policy, 7, 139–148.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Cooper, B., & Meiklejohn, D. (2003). A new approach for travel behaviour change in universities. Paper presented to 26th Australasian Transport Research Forum (ATRF), Wellington, New Zealand.Google Scholar
  24. Currie, G., & Delbosc, A. (2011). Travel demand management for the summer olympic games. Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, 2245, 36–48.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Curtis, C., & Holling, C. (2004). Just how (travel) smart are Australian universities when it comes to implementing sustainable travel? World Transport Policy and Practice, 10(1), 22–33.Google Scholar
  26. Davison, L., Enoch, M., & Ison, S. (2010). European experience of travel plans: An expert perspective. Paper presented to 12th World Conference in Transportation Research, Lisbon, Portugal.Google Scholar
  27. DeGruyter, C., Rao, D., & Meiklejohn, D. (2005). Tools for travel behaviour change. Paper presented to 28th Australasian Transport Research Forum (ATRF), Sydney, Australia.Google Scholar
  28. Department for Transport. (2002). Using the planning process to secure travel plans: Best practice guidance for local authorities, developers and occupiers. London, UK: Department for Transport.Google Scholar
  29. Department for Transport. (2005). Making residential travel plans work: Guidelines for new development, London, UK.Google Scholar
  30. Department for Transport. (2007). Making residential travel plans work, London, UK.Google Scholar
  31. Department for Transport. (2009). Good practice guidelines: Delivering travel plans through the planning process. London, UK: Department for Transport.Google Scholar
  32. Department of Infrastructure. (2008). TravelSmart travel planning guide, Victoria, Australia.Google Scholar
  33. Department of Transport. (undated-a). Travel planning case study: Love living local—City of Darebin. Victoria, Australia: Department of Transport.Google Scholar
  34. Department of Transport. (undated-b). Travel planning case study: School travel planning on the Bellarine Peninsula—City of Greater Geelong. Victoria, Australia: Department of Transport.Google Scholar
  35. Department of Transport. (undated-c). Travel planning case study: Transport Swinburne and corporate Boroondara—City of Boroondara. Victoria, Australia: Department of Transport.Google Scholar
  36. Department of Transport, Planning and Local Infrastructure. (2014a). A guide to the planning system. Retrieved September 25, 2014, from http://www.dpcd.vic.gov.au/planning/.
  37. Department of Transport, Planning and Local Infrastructure. (2014b). Planning schemes. Retrieved September 25, 2014, from http://www.dpcd.vic.gov.au/planning/planningschemes.
  38. Di Pietro, G., & Hughes, I. (2003). TravelSMART schools—There really is a better way to go! Paper presented to 26th Australasian Transport Research Forum (ATRF), Wellington, New Zealand.Google Scholar
  39. Dill, J. (1998). Mandatory employer-based trip reduction: What happened? Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, 1618, 103–110.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Enoch, M. (2012). Sustainable transport, mobility management and travel plans. Surrey, England: Ashgate Publishing Limited.Google Scholar
  41. Enoch, M., & Ison, S. (2008). Expert perspectives on the past, present and future of travel plans in the UK: Research report. Department for Transport and the National Business Travel Network.Google Scholar
  42. Enoch, M., & Potter, S. (2003). Encouraging the commercial sector to help employees change their travel behaviour. Transport Policy, 10, 51–58.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Enoch, M., & Rye, T. (2006). Travel plans: Using good practice to inform future policy. In B. Jourquin, P. Rietveld, & K. Westin (Eds.), Towards better performing transport networks (pp. 157–177). London, UK: Routledge.Google Scholar
  44. Ferguson, E. (2000). Travel demand management and public policy. England: Ashgate Publishing.Google Scholar
  45. Fraser, J., & Addison, L. (2002). Travel plans—A greenwash or an effective planning mechanism. Town and Country Planning, 275–277.Google Scholar
  46. Giuliano, G., Hwang, K., Perrine, D., & Wachs, M. (1991). Preliminary evaluation of regulation XV of the south coast air quality management district. Berkeley, California, US: University of California Transportation Center.Google Scholar
  47. Guiver, J., & Stanford, D. (2014). Why destination visitor travel planning falls between the cracks. Journal of Destination Marketing & Management.Google Scholar
  48. Halling, B., & Mayes, M. (2011). ‘Workin’ it—Making smarter travel at work smarter! Paper presented to 34th Australasian Transport Research Forum (ATRF), Adelaide, Australia.Google Scholar
  49. Hamre, A., & Buehler, R. (2014). Commuter mode choice and free car parking, public transportation benefits, showers/lockers, and bike parking at work: Evidence from the Washington, DC Region. Journal of Public Transportation, 17(2), 67–91.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  50. Hancock, L., & Nuttman, S. (2013). Engaging higher education institutions in the challenge of sustainability: Sustainable transport as a catalyst for action. Journal of Cleaner Production, 62, 62–71.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  51. Harrison, J. (2003). Travel plans and the planning system. Journal of Planning and Environment Law, 397–403.Google Scholar
  52. Hendricks, S. (2005). Effectiveness of programs for work site trip reduction: The influence of organisational culture. Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, 1924, 207–214.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  53. Hendricks, S. (2008). Four challenges to incorporating transportation demand management into the land development process. Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, 2046, 30–36.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  54. Hendricks, S., & Georggi, N. (2007). Documented impact of transportation demand management programs through the case study method. Journal of Public Transportation, 10(4), 79–98.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  55. Higgins, T. (1996). How do we know employer-based transportation demand management works? The need for experimental design. Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, 1564, 54–59.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  56. Hill, J. (2013). Proposed modifications to the regional transportation impact study guidelines—Public meeting, report P-13-031. Ontario, Canada: Region of Waterloo.Google Scholar
  57. Hinckson, E., & Badland, H. (2011). School travel plans: Preliminary evidence for changing school-related travel patterns in elementary school children. American Journal of Health Promotion, 25(6), 368–371.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  58. Hinckson, E., Duncan, S., & Badland, H. (2009). Can school travel plans change the way children commute? Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 12.Google Scholar
  59. Holzer, P. (2004). Attitudes of private developers towards travel demand management. Student Internship Report, Swinburne University.Google Scholar
  60. Hooi, J. (2012). Travel smart: You don’t have to go to work all together. The Business Times.Google Scholar
  61. Howlett, R., & Watson, T. (2010). Travel planning in Victoria—A new strategic approach to sustaining communities. Paper presented to 33rd Australasian Transport Research Forum (ATRF), Canberra, Australia.Google Scholar
  62. Ison, S., Merkert, R., & Mulley, C. (2014). Policy approaches to public transport at airports—Some diverging evidence from the UK and Australia. Transport Policy, 35, 265–274.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  63. Ison, S., & Rye, T. (2008). The implementation and effectiveness of transport demand management measures: An international perspective. Hampshire, UK: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  64. Jollon, M. (2013). Best practices in integrating travel plans with the development approval process: Examples from the USA. Paper presented to Planning Institute of Australia (PIA) 2013 National Congress, Canberra, Australia.Google Scholar
  65. Khagram, A. (2013a). Travel plan monitoring officer report: Covering autumn 2012. UK: WestTrans.Google Scholar
  66. Khagram, A. (2013b). Travel plan monitoring officer report: Covering Spring 2013. UK: WestTrans.Google Scholar
  67. Khagram, A. (2014). The five cards that will ensure a travel plan is more than just a bluff. TransportXtra.Google Scholar
  68. Khandokar, F., Ryley, T., Ison, S., & Price, A. (2013). A survey on hospital travel plans in England. Paper presented to 92nd Transportation Research Board (TRB) Annual Meeting, Washington DC.Google Scholar
  69. Llewellyn, R., Tricker, R., & Paton, D. (2014). Travel plans: A critical comparison of the application of land use planning processes in England and Scotland. Transport, iFirst, 1–13.Google Scholar
  70. Lopez-Aqueres, W. (1993). Conceptual framework to study the effectiveness of employer trip-reduction programs. Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, 1404, 55–63.Google Scholar
  71. Mammen, G., et al. (2013). Active school travel: An evaluation of the Canadian school travel planning intervention. Preventive Medicine.Google Scholar
  72. Mammen, G., Stone, M., Buliung, R., & Faulkner, G. (2014). School travel planning in Canda: Identifying child, family and school-level characteristics associated with travel mode shift from driving to active school travel. Journal of Transport & Health.Google Scholar
  73. Marsden Jacob Associates. (2011). Evaluation of the TravelSmart local government and workplace programs. Perth, Australia: WA Department of Transport.Google Scholar
  74. McFadden, H., DeGruyter, C., & Watson, T. (2006). Widening the scope: Delivery of travel behaviour change initiatives by local government in Victoria. Paper presented to Australian Institute of Traffic Management and Planning (AITPM) National Conference Melbourne, Australia.Google Scholar
  75. Meiklejohn, D., & Wake, D. (2007). A tale of two cities: Workplace travel plan programs in Melbourne and Perth. Paper presented to 30th Australasian Transport Research Forum, Melbourne, Australia.Google Scholar
  76. Mele, L. (2013). TDM membership by Condo corporation. 8 July 2013, Email communication to Pat Fisher (City of Waterloo, Ontario).Google Scholar
  77. Melia, S. (2009). Potential for carfree development in the UK. PhD Thesis, University of West England.Google Scholar
  78. Melia, S., Barton, H., & Parkhurst, G. (2013). Potential for carfree development in the UK. Urban Design and Planning, 166(DP2), 136–145.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  79. Miller, E. (1995). Truth about employer trip reduction programs. TDM Review, 3(2), 14–16.Google Scholar
  80. Moghtaderi, F., Burke, M., & Dodson, J. (2012). A systematic review of children’s travel behaviour change programs in Australia. Paper presented to 35th Australasian Transport Research Forum (ATRF), Perth, Australia.Google Scholar
  81. Morris, D., Enoch, M., Pitfield, D., & Ison, S. (2009). Car-free development through UK community travel plans. Urban Design and Planning, 162(DPI), 19–27.Google Scholar
  82. Myers, K. (2005). Travel behaviour change initiatives: A local government’s innovations. Paper presented to 28th Australasian Transport Research Forum (ATRF), Sydney, Australia.Google Scholar
  83. Newson, C., Cairns, S., & Davis, A. (2010). Making school travel plans work: Experience from English case studies, Transport for Quality of Life.Google Scholar
  84. NSW Government. (2011). Active travel: Optus relocation. Premier’s council for active living. Retrieved September 25, 2014, from http://www.pcal.nsw.gov.au/case_studies/optus.
  85. NZ Transport Agency. (2011). Workplace travel plan guidelines. Wellington, New Zealand: New Zealand Government.Google Scholar
  86. Orski, C. K. (1993). Evaluation of employee trip reduction programs based on California’s experience with regulation XV. Paper presented to 1993 ITE International Conference.Google Scholar
  87. Pagano, A., & Verdin, J. (1997). Employee trip reduction without government mandates: Cost and effectiveness estimates from Chicago. Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, 1598, 43–48.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  88. Petrunoff, N., Rissel, C., Wen, L. W., Xu, H., Meiklejohn, D., & Schembri, A. (2013). Developing a hospital travel plan: Process and baseline findings from a western Sydney hospital. Australian Health Review, 37(5), 579–584.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  89. Potter, S., & Enoch, M. (2007). Mobility management in organisations. In J. P. Warren (Ed.), Managing transport energy: Power for a sustainable future (pp. 93–120). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  90. RAC. (2014). Travel planning for new developments: Advice for local governments. Perth, Western Australia: RAC Mobility Bulletin #01. Retrieved September 25, 2014, from http://rac.com.au/.
  91. Richter, J., Friman, M., & Gärling, T. (2011). Soft transport policy measures: Gaps in knowledge. International Journal of Sustainable Transportation, 5(4), 199–215.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  92. Roby, H. (2010a). Can travel plans escape the planning Ghetto?’ Town and Country Planning.Google Scholar
  93. Roby, H. (2010b). Using innovation and business models to analyse the organisational embedding of travel plans. PhD Thesis, Open University.Google Scholar
  94. Roby, H. (2010c). Workplace travel plans: Past, present and future. Journal of Transport Geography, 18, 23–30.Google Scholar
  95. Rose, G., & Ampt, E. (2001). Travel blending: An Australian travel awareness initiative. Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, 6(2), 95–110.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  96. Rye, T. (1997). The implementation of workplace transport demand management in large organisations. PhD Thesis, Nottingham Trent University.Google Scholar
  97. Rye, T. (1999a). Employer attitudes to employer transport plans: A comparison of UK and Dutch experience. Transport Policy, 6, 183–196.Google Scholar
  98. Rye, T. (1999b). Employer transport plans—A case for regulation? Transport Reviews, 19(1), 13–31.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  99. Rye, T., Green, C., Young, E., & Ison, S. (2011a). Using the land-use planning process to secure travel plans: An assessment of progress in England to date. Journal of Transport Geography, 19(2), 235–243.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  100. Rye, T., Welsch, J., Plevnik, A., & de Tomassi, R. (2011b). First steps towards cross-national transfer in integrating mobility management and land use planning in the EU and Switzerland. Transport Policy, 18, 533–543.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  101. Seggerman, K., & Hendricks, S. (2005). Incorporating TDM into the land development process. State of Florida: Department of Transportation.Google Scholar
  102. Smith, L. (2010). School travel plans: How successful are they? Traffic Engineering and Control, 189–193.Google Scholar
  103. Steer Davies Gleave. (2001). Take-up and effectiveness of travel plans and travel awareness campaigns: Final report. London, UK: Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions.Google Scholar
  104. Stewart, J. (1994). Reducing drive-alone rates at small employer sites: Costs and benefits of local trip reduction ordinances—Pasadena towers case study. Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, 1433, 159–163.Google Scholar
  105. Sullivan, C., & Percy, A. (2008). Evaluating changes associated with workplace and school travel plans—Something old, something borrowed, something new. Paper presented to 31st Australasian Transport Research Forum (ATRF), Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.Google Scholar
  106. Thom, A. (2009). Behaviour change towards sustainable travel in Perth—The TravelSmart workplace program. Paper presented to PATREC Research Forum, Curtin University Perth, Australia.Google Scholar
  107. Transport for London. (2008). Guidance for residential travel planning in London. London, UK: Transport for London.Google Scholar
  108. Transport for London. (2011a). ATTrBuTE v3 user guide, London, UK. Retrieved September 25, 2014, from http://www.attrbute.org.uk/.
  109. Transport for London. (2011b). Travel planning for new development in London—Incorporating deliveries and servicing. UK: Transport for London.Google Scholar
  110. Travel Plan Services Ltd. (2013). Newcastle great park framework travel plan implementation: Annual progress and monitoring report, Wakefield, UK.Google Scholar
  111. TRICS. (undated). UK standard assessment method for travel plan impacts: Advice for developers and planning authorities, UK. http://www.trics.org/.
  112. Van Malderen, L., et al. (2013). Exploring the profession of mobility manager in Belgium and their impact on commuting. Transportation Research Part A, 55, 46–55.Google Scholar
  113. Vanoutrive, T., Van Malderen, L., Jourquin, B., Thomas, I., Verhetsel, A., & Witlox, F. (2010). Mobility management measures by employers: Overview and exploratory analysis for Belgium. European Journal of Transport Infrastructure and Research, 10(2), 121–141.Google Scholar
  114. Wake, D. (2012). Engaging Perth workplaces for sustainable transport: An evaluation of the TravelSmart workplace program. Paper presented to 35th Australasian Transport Research Forum (ATRF), Perth, Australia.Google Scholar
  115. Wake, D., Thom, A., & Cummings, R. (2010). Evaluating workplace travel plans. Paper presented to 33rd Australasian Transport Research Forum (ATRF), Canberra, Australia.Google Scholar
  116. Wiblin, S. (2010). Integrating travel behaviour change for workers, shoppers and residents at an outer suburban centre. Paper presented to 33rd Australasian Transport Research Forum (ATRF), Canberra, Australia.Google Scholar
  117. Wiblin, S., Mulley, C., & Ison, S. (2012). Precinct wide travel plans—Learnings from Rouse Hill Town Centre. Paper presented to 35th Australasian Transport Research Forum (ATRF), Perth, Australia.Google Scholar
  118. Winters, P., Perez, R., Joshi, A., & Perone, J. (2005). Work site trip reduction model and manual. Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, 1924, 197–206.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  119. Woodruff, A., & Hui, C. (2010). Integrating planning in activity centres: Influencing change across all travel purposes. Paper presented to 33rd Australasian Transport Research Forum (ATRF), Canberra, Australia.Google Scholar
  120. Wright, L. (2005). Sustainable Transport: A Sourcebook for Policy-makers in Developing Cities Module 3e Car-Free Development, Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ) GmbH. Eschborn, Germany: Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development.Google Scholar
  121. WSP. (2014). Does car ownership increase car use? A study of the use of car parking within residential developments in London. UK: Commissioned by the Berkeley Group.Google Scholar
  122. Wynne, L. (2013). Travel planning and the land-use planning system: Understanding the effectiveness of travel planning requirements in NSW development control plans. Unpublished Masters Thesis, University of New South Wales, Australia.Google Scholar
  123. Yeates, S., & Enoch, M. (2012). Travel plans from the developer perspective. Paper presented to 91st Transportation Research Board (TRB) Annual Meeting, Washington DC.Google Scholar
  124. Young, R., & Luo, R. (1995). Five-year results of employee commute options in southern California. Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, 1496, 191–198.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Civil Engineering, Institute of Transport StudiesMonash UniversityClaytonAustralia

Personalised recommendations