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A Disciplinary Field Model for Systemology

  • David Rousseau
  • Jennifer Wilby
  • Julie Billingham
  • Stefan Blachfellner
Chapter
Part of the Translational Systems Sciences book series (TSS, volume 13)

Abstract

The field of systems is still a nascent academic discipline, with a high degree of fragmentation, no common perspective on the disciplinary structure of the systems domain, and many ambiguities in its use of the term “General Systems Theory”. In this chapter we develop a generic model for the structure of a discipline (of any kind) and of disciplinary fields of all kinds, and use this to develop a Typology for the domain of systems.

We identify the domain of systems as a transdisciplinary field, and reiterate proposals to call it “Systemology” and its unifying theory GST* (pronounced “G-S-T-star”). We propose names for other major components of the field, and present a tentative map of the systems field, highlighting key gaps and shortcomings. We argue that such a model of the systems field can be helpful for guiding the development of Systemology into a fully-fledged academic field, and for understanding the relationships between Systemology as a transdisciplinary field and the specialized disciplines with which it is engaged.

Keywords

Systemology Transdisciplinarity General systemology General systems transdisciplinarity GSTD Systems philosophy General systems theory GST 

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Copyright information

© David Rousseau 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Rousseau
    • 1
  • Jennifer Wilby
    • 2
  • Julie Billingham
    • 1
  • Stefan Blachfellner
    • 3
  1. 1.Centre for Systems PhilosophyAddlestoneUK
  2. 2.Centre for Systems Studies, University of HullKingston upon HullUK
  3. 3.Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems ScienceViennaAustria

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