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Introduction

  • David Rousseau
  • Jennifer Wilby
  • Julie Billingham
  • Stefan Blachfellner
Chapter
Part of the Translational Systems Sciences book series (TSS, volume 13)

Abstract

The quest for a scientific general systems theory formally started in the 1950s, but progress has been slow. In this chapter we introduce General Systemology, and discuss its origins in the 1950s and its subsequent history in the general systems movement. We discuss its potential and challenges, and outline the key steps needed to establish it as a useful academic discipline.

Keywords

Systemology General systemology General systems theory GST GST 

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Copyright information

© David Rousseau 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Rousseau
    • 1
  • Jennifer Wilby
    • 2
  • Julie Billingham
    • 1
  • Stefan Blachfellner
    • 3
  1. 1.Centre for Systems PhilosophyAddlestoneUK
  2. 2.Centre for Systems Studies, University of HullKingston upon HullUK
  3. 3.Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems ScienceViennaAustria

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