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The Relevance of Contextual Components in the Religious Conversion Process: The Case of Dusun Muslims in Brunei Darussalam

  • Asiyah az-Zahra Ahmad KumpohEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Asia in Transition book series (AT, volume 4)

Abstract

Employing Lewis Rambo’s stage-based theory of religious conversion, this chapter aims to explore the conversion process of Dusun Muslim converts to Islam in Brunei and to demonstrate the existence of the stages in their conversion experience. Analysing the interview data of the Dusun Muslims against the spread of results of previous studies, the main finding of this study reveals the unique experience of the Dusun Muslim converts. This is primarily due to the specific influences of the contextual components, in which each of these influences the characteristics of a specific conversion stage. The discussion shows how the different contextual components are at work at each point or stage and how they determine the sequence of the conversion stages. If the relevant component does not exist or is not available, the function of the stage could not operate, potentially causing the convert to sidestep the stage in the conversion process. This will lead converts to experience a specific sequence of conversion stages, as determined by the contextual components.

Keywords

Brunei Dusun Muslims Religious conversion Islam 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Universiti Brunei DarussalamBandar Seri BegawanBrunei

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