Advertisement

An Overview of Cultural Research in Sabah

  • Jacqueline Pugh-KitinganEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Asia in Transition book series (AT, volume 4)

Abstract

Set against a background sketch of its peoples and cultures, this chapter traces the history of cultural research in Sabah, the East Malaysian state situated in northern Borneo. It takes the reader from accounts by European explorers and missionaries, and records of officers of the British North Borneo Chartered Company in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, to post-Second World War research and the eventual development of the Sabah Society, the Department of Sabah Museum, the Borneo Research Council and the Institut Linguistik SIL–Cawangan Malaysia (now SIL Malaysia). It then briefly introduces some of the social and cultural research done since the establishment of Universiti Malaysia Sabah (UMS) in 1994, especially under its former School of Social Sciences (that combined with the School of Arts to form the Faculty of Humanities, Arts and Heritage in 2014), some of its research units and the Kadazandusun Chair. The discussion highlights some of the main researchers and their work over the years, especially in the fields of anthropology, linguistics, archaeology and ethnomusicology.

Keywords

Sabah Cultural research Anthropology Linguistics Archaeology Ethnomusicology 

References

  1. Alman, Elizabeth, and John Alman. 1963a. Handicraft in North Borneo. Jesselton: Sabah Publishing House.Google Scholar
  2. Alman, Elizabeth, and John Alman. 1963b. Handicraft in Sabah. Kuching: Borneo Literature Bureau.Google Scholar
  3. Alman, John H. 1961. If you can’t sing, you can beat a gong. Sabah Society Journal 1(1):29–42.Google Scholar
  4. Antonissen, A. 1958. Kadazan dictionary and grammar. Canberra: Government Printer.Google Scholar
  5. Appell, George N. 1967. Ethnography of northern Borneo: critical review of some recent publications. Oceania 37(3):178–185.Google Scholar
  6. Appell, George N. 1978. The Rungus Dusun. In Essays on Borneo societies, ed. Victor T. King, 143–171. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  7. Appell, George N. 1986. Social anthropological research among the Rungus Dusun: a talk for the Sabah Society. Sabah Society Journal 8(2):194–209.Google Scholar
  8. Appell, George N. 1992. The Sabah oral literature project. Paper presented at Borneo Research Council Second Biennial International Conference, 13–17 July, Kota Kinabalu.Google Scholar
  9. Appell, George N., ed. 1976. The societies of Borneo: explorations in the theory of cognatic social structure. Washington, DC: American Anthropological Association.Google Scholar
  10. Appell, George N., and Laura W.R. Appell. 2003. Death among the Rungus Momogun of Sabah, Malaysia: the dissolution of personhood and dispersion of the multiple souls and spiritual counterparts. In Journeys of the soul: anthropological studies of death, burial, and reburial practices in Borneo, ed. William D. Wilder, 41–119. Phillips, ME: Borneo Research Council Monograph Series 7.Google Scholar
  11. Appell, George N., Peter R. Goethals, Robert Harrison, and Clifford Sather. 1966. North Borneo ethnography: a protest. American Anthropologist 68(6):1505–1507.Google Scholar
  12. Bellwood, Peter. 1984a. The great Pacific migration. In Yearbook of science and the future, ed. David Calhoun, 80–93. Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica.Google Scholar
  13. Bellwood, Peter. 1984b. Archaeological research in the Madai-Baturong region, Sabah. Bulletin of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association 5:38–54.Google Scholar
  14. Bellwood, Peter. 1988. Archaeological research in south-eastern Sabah. Sabah Museum Monograph Vol. 2. Kota Kinabalu: Sabah Museum and State Archives Department.Google Scholar
  15. Bellwood, Peter. 1989. Archaeological investigations at Bukit Tengkorak and Segarong, south-eastern Sabah. Bulletin of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association 9:122–162.Google Scholar
  16. Boutin, Michael. 1985. Indigenous groups of Sabah: an annotated bibliography of linguistic and anthropological sources. Supplement 1. Kota Kinabalu: Sabah Museum Monograph, No. 1, Part II.Google Scholar
  17. Boutin, Michael, and Alanna Boutin. 1984. Indigenous groups of Sabah: an annotated bibliography of linguistic and anthropological sources. Kota Kinabalu: Sabah Museum Monograph No.1.Google Scholar
  18. Boutin, Michael E., Patricia Regis, and Jacqueline Pugh-Kitingan. 2006. Coastal and island groups of Sabah. In The encyclopedia of Malaysia, vol. 12: Peoples and traditions, ed. Hood Salleh, 128–129. Kuala Lumpur: Editions Didier Millet.Google Scholar
  19. Brewis, Kielo A. 1990. The Timugon Murut. In Social organization of Sabah societies: studies from six societies, Bonggi, Ida’an, Lotud, Makiang, Tagal, Timugon, ed. Sherwood G. Lingenfelter, 13–38. Kota Kinabalu: Sabah Museum and State Archives Department. Google Scholar
  20. Brewis, Kielo A. 1992. Self as the mirror of cosmos: a Timugon perspective. Paper presented at Borneo Research Council Second Biennial International Conference, 13–17 July, Kota Kinabalu.Google Scholar
  21. Brewis, Kielo A. 1993. Some aspects of Timugon worldview. Sabah Society Journal 10:1–6.Google Scholar
  22. Brewis, Richard, and Kielo A. Brewis. 2004. Ikhtisar etnografi. In Kamus Murut Timugon–Melayu, dengan ikhtisar etnografi. Kota Kinabalu: Kadazandusun Language Foundation.Google Scholar
  23. Clayre, Beatrice M. 1966. A comparison of some dialects of Dusun. Sabah Society Journal 3(1):3–12.Google Scholar
  24. Clayre, Beatrice M. 1967. Two favourite clause types in use in Dusun. Sabah Society Journal 3(3):113–127.Google Scholar
  25. Clayre, Beatrice M. 1970a. Focus: a preliminary survey of some languages of eastern Malaysia. Sarawak Museum Journal 18:193–219.Google Scholar
  26. Clayre, Beatrice M. 1970b. Some notes on the grammar of Dusun. Sabah Society Journal 5(2):133–140.Google Scholar
  27. Combrink, Hans J.B., Craig Soderberg, Michael E. Boutin, and Alana Boutin. 2006a. Indigenous groups of Sabah: an annotated bibliography of linguistic and anthropological sources. Part 1: authors, revised and updated edition. Kota Kinabalu: Department of Sabah Museum.Google Scholar
  28. Combrink, Hans J.B., Craig Soderberg, Michael E. Boutin, and Alana Boutin. 2006b. Indigenous groups of Sabah: an annotated bibliography of linguistic and anthropological sources. Part 2: ethnic group index, topic index, revised and updated edition. Kota Kinabalu: Department of Sabah Museum.Google Scholar
  29. Doolittle, Amity A. 2005. Property and politics in Sabah, Malaysia: native struggles over land rights. Seattle: University of Washington Press.Google Scholar
  30. Evans, Ivor H.N. 1922. Among primitive peoples in Borneo. London: Seeley, Service.Google Scholar
  31. Evans, Ivor H.N. 1923. Studies in religion, folklore and customs in British North Borneo and the Malay Peninsula. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Google Scholar
  32. Evans, Ivor H.N. 1953. The religion of the Tempasuk Dusuns of North Borneo. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  33. Fernando, Sunetra. 2002. Tagunggu practice by the Bajau of Semporna, Sabah. Tirai Panggung: Jurnal Seni Persembahan 5:17–29.Google Scholar
  34. Forrest, Thomas. 1969 [1779]. A voyage to New Guinea and the Moluccas, from Balambangan. Kuala Lumpur: Oxford University Press, originally published by J. Robson.Google Scholar
  35. Frame, Edward N. 1974. Field notes. Unpublished mimeo.Google Scholar
  36. Frame, Edward N. 1975. A preliminary survey of several major musical instruments and form types of Sabah, Malaysia. Borneo Research Bulletin 7(1):16–24.Google Scholar
  37. Frame, Edward N. 1976. Several major musical forms in Sabah. Journal of the Malaysian Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society 49(2):156–163.Google Scholar
  38. Frame, Edward N. 1982. The musical instruments of Sabah, Malaysia. Ethnomusicology 26(2):247–274.Google Scholar
  39. George, K.M. 1981. Historical development of education. In Commemorative history of Sabah, 1991–1981, ed. Anwar Sullivan, and Cecilia Leong, 467–522. Kuala Lumpur: Sabah State Government Centenary Publications Committee.Google Scholar
  40. Glyn-Jones, Monica. 1953. The Dusun of the Penampang plains in North Borneo. Vols 1 and 2. London: Her Majesty’s Stationery Office, Colonial Social Science Research Council.Google Scholar
  41. Gossens, A.L. 1924. A grammar and vocabulary of the Dusun language. Journal of the Malayan Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society 2(2):87–220.Google Scholar
  42. Hanafi Hussin, and M.C.M. Santamaria, eds. 2012. Sama celebrations: ritual, music and dance of Sama Dilaut and Sama Bajau in southern Philippines and North Borneo. Kuala Lumpur: Institute of Ocean and Earth Sciences, University of Malaya.Google Scholar
  43. Harrison, Robert. 1976. Hamlet organization and its relationship to productivity in the swidden-rice communities of Ranau, Sabah, Malaysia. In The societies of Borneo: explorations in the theory of cognatic social structure, ed. George N. Appell, 87–109. Washington: American Anthropological Association.Google Scholar
  44. Harrisson, Tom. 1956. The diary of Mr. W. Pretyman. Sarawak Museum Journal 7(8):335–404.Google Scholar
  45. Harrisson, Tom. 1957. The diary of Mr. W. Pretyman, 2. Sarawak Museum Journal 8:200–235.Google Scholar
  46. Harrisson, Tom. 1958. Mr. Pretyman’s North Borneo diary, 3. Sarawak Museum Journal 8:332–350.Google Scholar
  47. Harrisson, Tom. 1959. The diary of Mr. W. Pretyman, 4. Sarawak Museum Journal 9:74–111.Google Scholar
  48. Harrisson, Tom, and Barbara Harrisson. 1970. The prehistory of Sabah. Kota Kinabalu: The Sabah Society, Sabah Society Journal Monograph 4.Google Scholar
  49. Hatton, Frank. 1885. North Borneo, explorations and adventures on the equator. London: Sampson Low, Marsten, Searle and Rivington.Google Scholar
  50. Kasatkina, Alexandra. 2010. Imagining North Borneo through the photographs of Albert Grubauer. Paper presented at 10th Borneo Research Council Conference, 5–7 July, Curtin University of Technology, Miri, Sarawak.Google Scholar
  51. Kasatkina, Alexandra. 2012. Fragments of the past: ethnographic objects brought by Albert Grubauer from North Borneo. Paper presented at 11th International Borneo Research Council Conference, 25–27 June, Universiti Brunei Darussalam.Google Scholar
  52. King, Julie K., and John Wayne King, eds. 1997 [1984]. Languages of Sabah: a survey report. Canberra: Department of Linguistics, Australian National University, Pacific Linguistics, Series C, 78.Google Scholar
  53. Landgraf, John. 1956. Interim report to the government of the colony of British North Borneo on field work done under the supervision of the Department of Medical Studies, 1954–1955. Jesselton: Government Printing Department.Google Scholar
  54. Lasimbang, Rita, and John Miller, comps. 1995. Kadazan Dusun–Malay–English Dictionary. Kota Kinabalu: Kadazan Dusun Cultural Association.Google Scholar
  55. Lees, Shirley P. 1964a. Jungle fire. London: Oliphants.Google Scholar
  56. Lees, Shirley P. 1964b. Apparent and real differences in Dusun linguistics. Sarawak Museum Journal 11:574–577.Google Scholar
  57. Lees, Shirley P. 1966. Murut orthography. Sabah Society Journal 3(2):90–97.Google Scholar
  58. Lingenfelter, Sherwood G., ed. 1991 [1990]. Social organization of Sabah societies: studies from six societies, Bonggi, Ida’an, Lotud, Makiang, Tagal, Timugon. Kota Kinabalu: Sabah Museum and State Archives Department.Google Scholar
  59. Miyamoto, Masaru, and Judeth John Baptist, eds. 2008. Legal culture in South-East Asia and East Africa. Kota Kinabalu: Department of Sabah Museum, Sabah Museum Monograph Vol. 11.Google Scholar
  60. Miyamoto, Masaru, and Patricia Regis, eds. 2002. Cultural adaptation in Borneo. Kota Kinabalu: Department of Sabah Museum, Sabah Museum Monograph Vol. 7.Google Scholar
  61. Mohd Anis Md Nor, Patricia Matusky, Tan Sooi Beng, Jacqueline Pugh-Kitingan, Felicidad Prudente, and Hanafi Hussin, eds. 2011. Hybridity in the performing arts of Southeast Asia. Proceedings of the 1st symposium of the ICTM Study Group on the Performing Arts of Southeast Asia. Kuala Lumpur: Nusantara Performing Arts Research Centre and Department of Southeast Asian Studies, University of Malaya.Google Scholar
  62. Mohd Anis Md Nor, Patricia Matusky, Tan Sooi Beng, Jacqueline Pugh-Kitingan, Felicidad Prudente, and Hanafi Hussin, eds. 2013. (Re)producing Southeast Asian performing arts & Southeast Asian bodies, music, dance and other movement arts. Proceedings of the 2nd symposium of the ICTM Study Group on Performing Arts of Southeast Asia. Manila: Philippine Women’s University.Google Scholar
  63. Mohd Anis Md Nor, Patricia Matusky, Tan Sooi Beng, Jacqueline Pugh-Kitingan, Made Hood, and Hafzan Zannie Hamza, eds. 2015. Interculturalism and the mobility of the performing arts. Sound, movement, place—choreomusicology of humanly organised expression. New research: revitalizing and conserving traditions. Proceedings of the 3rd Symposium of the ICTM Study Group on the Performing Arts of Southeast Asia. Denpasar, Bali: Institut Seni Indonesia Denpasar (ISI Denpasar).Google Scholar
  64. Oppenheimer, Stephen, Martin Richards, and Vincent Macaulay. 2000. Austronesian homeland in Island Southeast Asia: a genetic perspective. Borneo 2000. Proceedings of the Sixth Borneo Research Council Research Conference, ed. Michael Leigh, 72–91. Kota Samarahan: Universiti Malaysia Sarawak, Sarawak Development Institute.Google Scholar
  65. Phelan, Peter R. 1997. Traditional stone and wood monuments of Sabah. Kota Kinabalu: Centre for Borneo Studies, Sabah Foundation.Google Scholar
  66. Pigafetta, Antonio. 1906. Magellan’s voyage around the world. Vol. 1., ed. James Alexander Robinson. Cleveland: Arthur H. Clark.Google Scholar
  67. Prenger, J. 1894. The Dusuns of North Borneo and their riddles. Journal of the Society of Orientalists 4(5):19–52.Google Scholar
  68. Prentice, D.J. 1969a. A word list for use in Borneo. In Papers in Borneo linguistics, ed. S.A. Wurm, 1–8. Canberra: Australian National University, Pacific Linguistics, Series A, 20.Google Scholar
  69. Prentice, D.J. 1969b. Verbal inflection in Sabah Murut. In Papers in Borneo linguistics, ed. S.A. Wurm, pp. 9–22. Canberra: Australian National University, Pacific Linguistics, Series A, 20.Google Scholar
  70. Prentice, D.J. 1969c. Phonemes of Sabah Murut. In Papers in Borneo linguistics, ed. S.A. Wurm, 23–41. Canberra: Australian National University, Pacific Linguistics, Series A, 20.Google Scholar
  71. Prentice, D.J. 1970. The linguistic situation in northern Borneo. In Pacific Linguistic Studies in Honour of Arthur Capell, eds. S.A. Wurm and D.C. Laycock, 369–408. Canberra: Australian National University, Pacific Linguistics, Series C, 13.Google Scholar
  72. Prentice, D.J. 1972. Notes on the place-names and personal names in the song-language of the Timugon Muruts. Sabah Society Journal 5(4):371–376.Google Scholar
  73. Prentice, Susan. 1988. Traditional gong music in the changing world of the Sabah Murut. Paper presented at the Asian Studies Association of Australia Bicentennial Conference.Google Scholar
  74. Pryer, Ada. 1894. A decade in Borneo. London: Hutchinson.Google Scholar
  75. Pryer, William. B. 1970 [1881]. Diary of a trip up the Kinabatangan River. Sabah Society Journal 5:117–126.Google Scholar
  76. Pugh-Kitingan, Jacqueline, and Judeth John Baptist. 2005. From coastal communities to interior peoples—the dispersion and diffusion of the Kulintangan in Sabah. In Borneo-Kalimantan 2005: Transformasi Sosial Masyarakat-Masyarakat di Daerah Pesisir Borneo-Kalimantan. Prosiding Konferensi Antara Universiti di Borneo-Kalimantan Ke-1, ed. Abdul Halim Ali, 1–12. Kota Samarahan: Institut Pengajian Asia Timur, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak.Google Scholar
  77. Pugh-Kitingan, Jacqueline, and Judeth John Baptist. 2009. Music for cleansing the universe—drumming and gong ensemble music in the Mamahui Pogun ceremonies of the Lotud Dusun of Tuaran, Sabah, Malaysia. Borneo Research Bulletin 40:249–276.Google Scholar
  78. Pugh-Kitingan, Jacqueline, ed. 2013. Proceedings of symposium on Sabah native land rights: issues, challenges and the way forward, 30–31 January 2012. Prosiding simposium hak tanah adat Sabah: isu, cabaran dan prospek masa depan, 30–31 Januari 2012. Kota Kinabalu: Kadazandusun Chair: Universiti Malaysia Sabah.Google Scholar
  79. Pugh-Kitingan, Jacqueline, Hanafi Hussin, and Judeth John Baptist. 2009a. A conduit between the seen and unseen: comparing the ritual roles of drumming and gong ensemble music in the Mamahui Pogun of the Lotud of Tuaran and the Monogit of the Kadazan of Penampang, Sabah. Tirai Panggung: Jurnal Seni Persembahan 9:98–123.Google Scholar
  80. Pugh-Kitingan, Jacqueline, Hanafi Hussin, and Judeth John Baptist. 2009b. Symbolic interactions between the seen and the unseen through gong music and dance in the Lotud Mamahui Pogun. Borneo Research Journal 3:221–237.Google Scholar
  81. Pugh-Kitingan, Jacqueline, Hanafi Hussin, and Judeth John Baptist. 2009c. The role of music and dance in Sabah’s coastal communities: examples from the Kadazan of Penampang and the Bajau Kubang of Semporna. In Boundaries and beyond: language culture and identity of Southeast Asia, eds. Maria Kristina S. Manueli, and Hanafi Hussin, 53–65. Kuala Lumpur: Department of Southeast Asian Studies, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, University of Malaya.Google Scholar
  82. Pugh-Kitingan, Jacqueline, Hanafi Hussin, and Judeth John Baptist. 2011. Music in the Monogit of the Kadazan of Penampang, Sabah, Malaysia. Musika Jornal 7:122–154.Google Scholar
  83. Pugh-Kitingan, Jacqueline, Hanafi Hussin, and Judeth John Baptist. 2012. Dance as ritual, dance as celebration—tradition and change amongst the Bajau of Semporna, Sabah, Malaysia. In Sama celebrations: ritual, music and dance of Sama Dilaut and Sama Bajau in southern Philippines and North Borneo, eds. Hanafi Hussin, and M.C.M. Santamaria. Kuala Lumpur: Institute of Ocean and Earth Sciences, University of Malaya, Monograph Series 12.Google Scholar
  84. Pugh-Kitingan, Jacqueline. 1988. Instruments and instrumental music of the Tambunan Kadazand/Dusun. Sabah Museum Journal 1(2):24–61.Google Scholar
  85. Pugh-Kitingan, Jacqueline. 1989. Cultural development in Sabah. In Sabah 25 Years later, 1963–1988, eds. Jeffrey G. Kitingan, and Maximus J. Ongkili, 359–404. Kota Kinabalu: Institute for Development Studies, Sabah.Google Scholar
  86. Pugh-Kitingan, Jacqueline. 1991. An introduction to Sabah’s cultures and music. In The Sabah Performing Arts Company from East Malaysia, 6–20. Hawaii: East-West Centre Institute of Culture and Communication.Google Scholar
  87. Pugh-Kitingan, Jacqueline. 2001. Some preliminary notes on the Sigi, a rare mouthorgan from Sabah, Malaysia. MANU: Jurnal Pusat Penataran Ilmu & Bahasa 6:56–64.Google Scholar
  88. Pugh-Kitingan, Jacqueline. 2003. Alat-Alat muzik dan muzik instrumental Kadazandusun Tambunan. Kota Kinabalu: Pejabat Kebudayaan dan Kesenian Negeri Sabah.Google Scholar
  89. Pugh-Kitingan, Jacqueline. 2004. Selected Papers on Music in Sabah. Kota Kinabalu: Kadazandusun Chair, Universiti Malaysia Sabah.Google Scholar
  90. Pugh-Kitingan, Jacqueline. 2010a. The Gabbang and its music among the Bajau Kubang of Semporna, Sabah, Malaysia. Journal of Maritime Geopolitics and Culture 1(1):123–140.Google Scholar
  91. Pugh-Kitingan, Jacqueline. 2010b. From Brunei? Preliminary enquiries about Iranun gong-making and metalwork at Tempasuk, Sabah, Malaysia. In Piakandatu ami Dr. Howard P. McKaughan, eds. Loren Billings, and Nelleke Goudswaarde, 225–229 (with photographs on CD). Manila: Linguistic Society of the Philippines and SIL Philippines.Google Scholar
  92. Pugh-Kitingan, Jacqueline. 2011a. Report on the project ‘The ethnographic and cultural mapping of Sabah. Part 1: Tambunan District’, Borneo Research Bulletin 42:233–247.Google Scholar
  93. Pugh-Kitingan, Jacqueline. 2011b. A Preliminary comparison of the Kadazandusun sompoton from Tambunan and the Tangara Murut kulundi of Inarad, Upper Kinabatangan. Gendang Alam 2:67–82.Google Scholar
  94. Pugh-Kitingan, Jacqueline. 2011c. Musical genres of the Iranun of Sabah: an overview. In The Iranun of Sabah: language and culture of an endangered minority, eds. James U.H. Chin, and Karla J. Smith, 129–138. Subang Jaya: Pelanduk Publications.Google Scholar
  95. Pugh-Kitingan, Jacqueline. 2011d. Dance and ritual in Sabah. In Sharing identities: celebrating dance in Malaysia, eds. Mohd Anis Md Nor, and Stephanie Burridge, 166–186. New Delhi: Routledge.Google Scholar
  96. Pugh-Kitingan, Jacqueline. 2011e. Kadazandusun gong ensembles in the ethnographic mapping of Tambunan, Sabah Malaysia. In Hybridity in the performing arts of Southeast Asia. Proceedings of the 1st Symposium of the ICTM Study Group on the Performing Arts in Southeast Asia, eds. Mohd Anis Md Nor, Patricia Matusky, Tan Sooi Beng, Jacqueline Pugh-Kitingan, and Felicidad Prudente, 203–209. Kuala Lumpur: Nusantara Performing Arts Research Centre.Google Scholar
  97. Pugh-Kitingan, Jacqueline. 2012. Gong ensemble music of the Dusun Tinagas of Sabah through the gaze of movement. Yearbook for Traditional Music 44:149–165.Google Scholar
  98. Pugh-Kitingan, Jacqueline. 2013. Music, movement, sport and identity: the moliliun tagunggak of the Gana Murut of Sabah, Malaysia. In (Re)producing Southeast Asian performing arts & Southeast Asian bodies, music, dance and other movement arts. Proceedings of the 2nd Symposium of the ICTM Study Group on Performing Arts of Southeast Asia, eds. Mohd Anis Md Nor, Patricia Matusky, Tan Sooi Beng, Jacqueline Pugh-Kitingan, and Felicidad Prudente, 162–168. Manila: Philippine Women’s University.Google Scholar
  99. Pugh-Kitingan, Jacqueline. 2014. Balancing the human and spiritual worlds: ritual, music, and dance among Dusunic societies in Sabah. Yearbook for Traditional Music 46:170–190.Google Scholar
  100. Regis, Patricia and Judeth John Baptist. 1982. The Creation Story of the Lotud. Unpublished manuscript, Sabah Museum.Google Scholar
  101. Regis, Patricia, and Judeth John Baptist. 1992. The Monumbui Rinait of the Lotud. Paper presented at Borneo Research Council 2nd Biennial International Conference, Kota Kinabalu, 15–18 July.Google Scholar
  102. Regis, Patricia, and Judeth John Baptist. 1993. Kuasa beras dan magisnya di kalangan masyarakat Lotud [Rice power and its magic amongst the Lotud]. In Segemati padi sekunca budi ke arah menghayati budaya padi, ed. Nik Safia Karim. Kuala Lumpur: Akademi Pengajian Melayu, University of Malaya.Google Scholar
  103. Regis, Patricia, and Judeth John Baptist. 1994. The creation story of the Lotud. Paper presented at Borneo Research Council 4th Biennial International Conference, Universitas Tanjungpura, Pontianak 15–18 July.Google Scholar
  104. Regis, Patricia, and Judeth John Baptist. 2002. Two perspectives of Lotud ritual responses to changes in the local landscape. Paper presented at Borneo Research Council 7th Biennial International Conference, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Kota Kinabalu, 15–18 July.Google Scholar
  105. Regis, Patricia, Jacqueline Pugh-Kitingan, and Judeth John-Baptist. 2003. Berunsai: meeting, match-making and music. Tirai Panggung: Jurnal Seni Persembahan. Pusat Kebudayaan, Universiti Malaya 6:23–37.Google Scholar
  106. Rooney, John. 1981. Khabar gembira: a history of the Catholic Church in East Malaysia and Brunei, 1880–1976. London: Burns & Oates and Kota Kinabalu: Mill Hill Missionaries.Google Scholar
  107. Roth, Henry Ling. 1968 [1886]. The natives of Sarawak and British North Borneo. Vols 1 and 2. Kuala Lumpur: University of Malaya Press, originally published by Truslove and Hansen.Google Scholar
  108. Rutter, Owen. 1922. British North Borneo: an account of its history, resources and native tribes. London: Constable.Google Scholar
  109. Rutter, Owen. 1929. The pagans of North Borneo. London: Hutchinson.Google Scholar
  110. Sabah Museum. 1992. Sabah’s heritage: a brief introduction to Sabah’s history and heritage. Kota Kinabalu: Sabah Musuem.Google Scholar
  111. Sather, Clifford, and Jacqueline Pugh-Kitingan. 2004. Story-telling in Sabah and Sarawak. In The encyclopedia of Malaysia, vol. 8: The performing arts, ed. Ghulam-Sarwar Yousof, 18–19. Kuala Lumpur: Editions Didier Millet.Google Scholar
  112. Sather, Clifford. 1966. Book review of The Dusun: a North Borneo society by Thomas Rhys Williams. Sarawak Museum Journal 14:389–392.Google Scholar
  113. Sather, Clifford. 1976. Kinship and contiguity: variation in social alignments among the Semporna Bajau Laut. In The societies of Borneo: explorations in the theory of cognatic social structure, ed. by George N. Appell, 40–65. Washington, DC: American Anthropological Association.Google Scholar
  114. Sather, Clifford. 1997. The Bajau Laut: adaptation, history, and fate in a maritime fishing society of south-eastern Sabah. Kuala Lumpur: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  115. Sather, Clifford. 2000. Bajau laut boat building in Semporna. Techniques & culture. 35-36:177-198.Google Scholar
  116. Sather, Clifford. 2004. Keeping the peace in an island world of violence: Sama Dilaut ways of managing conflict. In Leadership, justice and politics at the grassroots, ed. Anthony R. Walker, 127–158. Contributions to Southeast Asian ethnography, 12.Google Scholar
  117. Silver Jubilee Committee. 2002. St. Michael’s Parish Penampang souvenir program in conjunction with the silver jubilee of the diocese. Penampang: St Michael’s Church.Google Scholar
  118. Skog, Inge. n.d. Musicological investigation in Sabah: outline of a pilot study. Unpublished mimeo.Google Scholar
  119. Smith, Karla J. 2003. Minority language education in Malaysia: four ethnic communities’ experiences. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism 6(1):52–65.Google Scholar
  120. Smith, Karla J. 2008. Language and decisions: the Iranun of Sabah, Malaysia. PhD thesis, Charles Darwin University.Google Scholar
  121. St John, Spenser. 1974 [1858]. Life in the forests of the Far East, vols 1 and 2. Kuala Lumpur: Oxford University Press, originally published by London: Smith, Elder.Google Scholar
  122. Staal, J. 1923/1924. The Dusuns of North Borneo. Anthropos 18/19:958–957.Google Scholar
  123. Whitehead, John. 1893. Exploration of Mount Kina Balu, North Borneo. London: Gurney and Jackson.Google Scholar
  124. Williams, Thomas Rhys. 1961a. A Tambunan Dusun origin myth. Journal of American Folklore 74(291):68–73.Google Scholar
  125. Williams, Thomas Rhys. 1961b. Form, function and culture history of a Borneo musical instrument. Oceania 32(3):178–186.Google Scholar
  126. Williams, Thomas Rhys. 1962. Tambunan Dusun social structure. Sociologus 12:141–157.Google Scholar
  127. Williams, Thomas Rhys. 1965. The Dusun: a North Borneo society. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston.Google Scholar
  128. Williams, Thomas Rhys. 1969. Borneo childhood: enculturation in Dusun society. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston.Google Scholar
  129. Wong Tze Ken, Danny, and Stella Moo-Tan, eds. 2015. The diaries of George C. Woolley, vol. 1: 1901–1907. Kota Kinabalu: Department of Sabah Museum.Google Scholar
  130. Woolley, G.C. 1928. Murut songs. British North Borneo Herald 46(9):78–79. Reprinted as a booklet by the Government Press.Google Scholar
  131. Woolley, G.C. 1932. The Timoguns: a Murut tribe of the interior, North Borneo. Native Affairs Bulletin, 1. Jesselton: Government Printer.Google Scholar
  132. Woolley, G.C. 1939 [1953]. Murut adat: customs regulating inheritance among the Nabai tribe of Keningau, and the Timogun tribe of Tenom. Native Affairs Bulletin 3. Jesselton: Government Printing Department.Google Scholar
  133. Woolley, G.C. 1953 [1937]. Kwijau adat: customs regulating inheritance among the Kwijau tribe of the interior. Native Affairs Bulletin 6. Jesselton: Government Printing Department.Google Scholar
  134. Woolley, G.C. 1953 [1937]. Tuaran Adat: some customs of the Dusuns of Tuaran, West Coast Residency, North Borneo, first published as Native Affairs Bulletin 2. Jesselton: North Borneo Government Printing Office.Google Scholar
  135. Woolley, G.C. 1953a. Dusun adat: some customs regulating inheritance amongst the Dusun tribes in the coastal plains of Putatan and Papar. Native Affairs Bulletin 4. Jesselton: Government Printing Department.Google Scholar
  136. Woolley, G.C. 1953b. Dusun adat: some customs of the Dusun of Tambunan and Ranau, West Coast Residency, North Borneo. Native Affairs Bulletin 4. Jesselton: Government Printing Department.Google Scholar
  137. Woolley, G.C. 1962 [1932]. Dusun custom in Putatan District. Kota Kinabalu: National History Publications, first published as Native Affairs Bulletin. Jesselton: North Borneo Government Printing Office.Google Scholar
  138. Woolley, G.C. 1971. Extracts from the diary of Mr. G.C. Woolley, Inspector of Schools and Protector of Labour, 8 October 1941–20 November 1946. Sabah Society Journal 5:177–215.Google Scholar
  139. Yap Beng Liang. 1993. Orang Bajau Pulau Omadal: aspek-aspek budaya. Kuala Lumpur: Perpustakaan Negara Malaysia.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Universiti Malaysia SabahKota KinabaluMalaysia

Personalised recommendations