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Literature Review

  • Miron Kumar Bhowmik
  • Kerry J. Kennedy
Chapter
  • 650 Downloads
Part of the Education in the Asia-Pacific Region: Issues, Concerns and Prospects book series (EDAP, volume 32)

Abstract

The comprehensive literature review focuses on ethnic minority young people and issues for them ‘in school’ and ‘out of school’. It is organized into five sections. The first, provides a general overview of international literature examining the issues of ethnic diversity, multiculturalism, immigration, and their interrelations with educational outcomes. The next section reviews Hong Kong census data and describes the demographic characteristics of ethnic minority people and social issues that were related to those characteristics. To ascertain the social context that characterizes the ethnic minority population in Hong Kong, the third section examines relevant literature to gain such understandings. Ethnic minority students face a number of educational issues and challenges within the school system in Hong Kong. These areas are highlighted in the fourth section of the review. The fifth and final section identifies research gaps that were found in the literature and revisit the three research questions initially proposed.

Keywords

Ethnic Minority Chinese Student Chinese Language Special Administrative Region Ethnic Minority Population 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Miron Kumar Bhowmik
    • 1
  • Kerry J. Kennedy
    • 1
  1. 1.The Hong Kong Institute of EducationNew TerritoriesHong Kong

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