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Economic Change, Value Shift and Marriage Behaviour

  • Nobutaka Fukuda
Chapter

Abstract

The primary purpose of this chapter is to examine whether Japanese marriage patterns are affected by economic and ideational factors. Its second aim is to explore the extent to which the transition from single status to married status has an impact on attitudes towards partnership and family. To achieve these goals, we will begin by considering salient features of Japanese marriage behaviour. Then, we will discuss the relation between Japanese marriage patterns and societal changes. Thereafter, the influence of economic and ideational factors on marriage behaviour will be examined, followed by an explanation of data and methods used in this analysis. Finally, we will examine the influence of marriage on attitudes towards partnership and family relations.

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© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2016

Open Access This chapter is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial License, which permits any noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and source are credited.

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Tohoku UniversitySendaiJapan

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