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Transitioning to Kindergarten

Improving Outcomes for Preschool Children with Behavioral Challenges
  • Renee L. Garraway
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Part of the Studies in Inclusive Education book series (STUIE)

Abstract

The night before the start of my son’s kindergarten year, I could barely sleep. I experienced mixed emotions of joy and anxiety as I thought about my five-year-old beginning a new journey towards independence. Tired of the unpleasant phone calls, videos, and notes sent home from his pre-kindergarten teacher, I was relieved that “we” would have a new beginning.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Renee L. Garraway
    • 1
  1. 1.Educational LeadershipBowie State UniversityUSA

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